Showing posts with label Semantic Markup Schema. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Semantic Markup Schema. Show all posts

Thursday, 26 March 2015

How to get the new WordPress SEO 2.0 to Join Google's Knowledge Graph

The 'WordPress SEO 2.0' is the latest addition to the notorious YOAST SEO Plugin.
All what you have to do is to either download it, or if you already have it, just update it.


Once you do you will find this new feature which support Google’s new Knowledge Graph.




When Google has picked it up and shows a Knowledge Graph block for you or your company, it would look like this: (but it is not guaranteed of course)



Tuesday, 24 February 2015

20 Reasons Localization Is Essential To Website Conversions

Thanks to the global reach of the internet, website localisation is one of the best things you can do to increase website conversions. By creating a culture- and language-specific version of your website for each demographic market you target, you become a truly international business. All businesses, even small online retailers, can benefit from localization. In fact, you can’t afford not to have localized websites, and here are 20 reasons why.

1. It offers global expansion and increased reach.

Although English is still the predominant language online, other languages, most notably Chinese, Spanish, French, and Arabic, are quickly closing the distance. Offering web content in additional languages and cultures helps you increase your reach and become a respected international business.

2. Localization helps you appeal to multicultural audiences.

Translation helps international visitors find and buy from you, but it doesn’t consider cultural differences and sometimes doesn’t convey your message or brand very well. Localization includes both cultural and linguistic concerns, helping you reach audiences in different cultures much better.

3. It increases web traffic.

Search engines rank websites with localized versions or pages higher than non-localized websites and return your website as a result more often. On top of that, local sites are more likely to link to you when you provide information in the local language. Increasing traffic is one of the three most important things you can do to boost revenue, and more traffic means more sales.

4. You get more traffic from regional and language-specific search engines.

These smaller search engines have much less competition because they’re small and most businesses don’t have localized websites to appear in results. This means it’s much easier for your localized websites to rank higher than your English website. The higher you rank and the more often your website appears in search results, the more traffic and sales you get.

5. Localization increases brand recognition.

When you translate your website into the language and culture of your target market, you show that you respect and value your audience. They in turn are more aware of your business than your English-only competitors because they see your website more often and more easily understand your message.

6. Localization increases website stickiness and sales.

Having a strong localization plan boosts your presence and sales in a targeted area, such as localizing in French and German to increase sales in Europe. Multiple studies have found that when users are presented with a website in their native language, they stay on the site twice as long and are four times more likely to make a purchase from it.

7. It increases overall ROI.

Increased traffic, conversions, and brand awareness also leads to increased trust, credibility, customer loyalty, and satisfaction, in turn leading to more conversions. Localization is also scalable for both your audience and your budget, delivering huge benefits for only a marginal additional cost.

8. Localization maintains low printing and content distribution costs.

Localizing your website increases reach without raising these costs a few ways. First, you can reuse much of the same content across multiple languages; second, translating your website into a new language and culture is scalable; finally, having a web presence costs the same no matter what language or culture. Having a localized website may also eliminate the need for direct mail such as catalogs and brochures in various languages.

9. It is a cost-effective virtual branch office or satellite location.

Instead of building a brick-and-mortar store or renting an office in an international location, your localized websites become those virtual stores by offering information, products, contacts, and everything else you can deliver digitally.




10. Localization lowers customer support costs.

By answering questions and providing information in a target market’s native language and culture, you give customers what they need online in the best format for them, which reduces the need for multilingual phone and chat support.

11. It allows you to target minorities in your own area.

Many countries have large subgroups with their own languages, cultures, and skyrocketing purchasing power, such as the Latino market in the USA. Creating localized websites for these groups helps you solidify your presence and boost sales in your own area.

12. Localization maintains brand image and voice across cultures.

The problem with straight translation is that it doesn’t consider cultural differences and doesn’t always maintain your branding message. Localization is better than translation because it considers communication, sales incentive, design, layout, and programming specific to each culture and area, so you don’t lose the integrity of your brand across languages.

13. You become a local business.

Localizing your website turns you into a local business, which boosts conversions because many people want to buy locally, you get more traffic from local keywords, and you have an easier time building brand awareness.

14. Localization makes your local marketing stronger.

When you have a website specific to a certain area’s language and culture, your local internet marketing efforts (including search engine optimization, directory listings, and social media) benefit from having a local resource to point visitors to.

15. It makes you more trustworthy and credible.

By using the area’s local slang, idioms, metaphors, and figures of speech, you can communicate with your target customers more easily and directly, reducing confusion and boosting your own reputation.

16. Localization appeals to more customers.

Most web users don’t buy products online in a language other than their own. By offering them that option, you attract more prospects and close more sales.

17. It means fewer abandoned carts.

Programming can be as much a barrier as language or culture. Localization includes proper programming to prevent backend problems such as forms that make it difficult to input personal and payment info. Fewer problems means more closed sales and higher average order value.

18. Localization makes payment easier.

When you enable local credit cards, shipping and tax codes, and buying practices, your localized websites attract customers that would shop elsewhere otherwise, boosting your ROI, conversions, and revenue.

19. It increases local sales.

Offering products, support, FAQs, and other information in your customers’ native languages makes them more likely to buy from you because they have all the information they need in a format they understand to make an informed purchase.

20. Localization increases revenue.

Most consumers care more about language than price. So even if they know they can find a product cheaper somewhere else, they are more likely to buy from you at full price if you have a localized website for them.



Thursday, 27 March 2014

Let People Know "In Real-Time" When Your blog is Updated with PubSubHubbub

As a blogger (Publisher) you want to notify the cyberspace about your new blog post, first to get it crawled faster, and second to avoid your article being stolen by another Blog and it gets crawled and ranked before you do.

That is when PubSubHubHub comes in handy as it sends realtime notifications to blogfeed hubs when you update your blog.

A simple, open, server-to-server webhook-based pubsub (publish/subscribe) protocol for any web accessible resources.

Pubsubhubbub is used for content publishing by many websites, including all blogs served by blogger.com and WordPress.com, news sites including CNN and Fox news, and social networks like diaspora

Parties (servers) speaking the PubSubHubbub protocol can get near-instant notifications (via webhook callbacks) when a topic (resource URL) they're interested in is updated.

The protocol in a nutshell is as follows:
  • An resource URL (a "topic") declares its Hub server(s) in its HTTP Headers, via Link: <hub url>; rel=”hub” . The hub(s) can be run by the publisher of the resource, or can be acommunity hub that anybody can use: Google's, or Superfeedr.
  • A subscriber (a server that's interested in a topic), initially fetches the resource URL as normal. If the response declares its hubs, the subscriber can then avoid lame, repeated polling of the URL and can instead register with the designated hub(s) and subscribe to updates.
  • The subscriber subscribes to the Topic URL from the Topic URL's declared Hub(s).
  • When the Publisher next updates the Topic URL, the publisher software pings the Hub(s) saying that there's an update.
The protocol is decentralized and free. No company is at the center of this controlling it. Anybody can run a hub, or anybody can ping (publish) or subscribe using open hubs.
Google and Superfeedr offer a public and scalable open hub for anybody to use.




How to Use PubSubhubhub with your feeds?

  • Add an //atom:link tag under //atom:entry for Atom feeds or under //rss:rss/channel for RSS feeds. The //atom:link tag should haverel attribute set to hub and href attribute set to https://pubsubhubbub.appspot.com/
  • Alternatively, your feed can be served with two Link headers:
    • one with rel attribute set to hub and href attribute set to https://pubsubhubbub.appspot.com/
    • one with rel attribute set to self and href attribute set to the feed URL of the feed
  • The above is covered in more detail in the PubsubHubbub 0.4 specification.
  • Whenever new content is added to a feed, notify the hub. This is accomplished by sending a POST request tohttps://pubsubhubbub.appspot.com/ with Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded and two parameters encoded in the body:
    • hub.mode equal to publish
    • hub.url equal to the feed URL of the feed that has been updated. This field may be repeated to indicate multiple feeds that have been updated

Hub debug

From here you can,
  • Subscribe to a feed or debug your subscriber
  • Publish a feed or debug your published feeds

If you are a WordPress Blogger and wants to Ping the hub easily, there is a Plugin for that.
https://wordpress.org/plugins/pubsubhubbub/

The Plugin does the following:

Sends realtime notifications when you update your blog
Supports multi-user installations (WordPress MU)
Supports multiple hubs
Supports all of the feed formats used by WordPress, not just ATOM and RSS2
Supports latest spec (Version 0.4)
Announces which hubs you are using by adding <link rel="hub" ...> declarations to your template header and ATOM feed
Adds <atom:link rel="hub" ...> to your RSS feeds along with the necessary XMLNS declaration for RSS 0.92/1.0

Tuesday, 11 February 2014

Use rel="alternate" hreflang="x" annotations to Serve the Correct Language or Regional URL to Searchers!

The rel='alternate' attribute enables you to tell search engines that a web page is available in different language versions. For example, you could add the following to the head section of a web page if that page is available in English, German and French:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://en.example.com” hreflang=”en” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://de.example.com” hreflang=”de” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://.fr.example.com” hreflang=”fr” />

All other languages can be directed to the default version of your website:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://example.com” hreflang=”x-default” />

Some example scenarios where rel="alternate" hreflang="x" is recommended:
  • You keep the main content in a single language and translate only the template, such as the navigation and footer. Pages that feature user-generated content like a forums typically do this.
  • Your content has small regional variations with similar content in a single language. For example, you might have English-language content targeted to the US, GB, and Ireland.
  • Your site content is fully translated. For example, you have both German and English versions of each page.

Using language annotations

Imagine you have an English language page hosted at http://www.example.com/, with a Spanish alternative at http://es.example.com/. You can indicate to Google that the Spanish URL is the Spanish-language equivalent of the English page in one of three ways:
  • HTML link element in header. In the HTML <head> section of http://www.example.com/, add a link element pointing to the Spanish version of that webpage at http://es.example.com/, like this:
    <link rel="alternate" hreflang="es" href="http://es.example.com/" />
  • HTTP header. If you publish non-HTML files (like PDFs), you can use anHTTP header to indicate a different language version of a URL:
    Link: <http://es.example.com/>; rel="alternate"; hreflang="es"
  • Sitemap. Instead of using markup, you can submit language version information in a Sitemap.
If you have multiple language versions of a URL, each language page must identify all language versions, including itself.  For example, if your site provides content in French, English, and Spanish, the Spanish version must include a rel="alternate" hreflang="x" link for itself in addition to links to the French and English versions. Similarly, the English and French versions must each include the same references to the French, English, and Spanish versions.
You can specify multi-language URLs in the same domain as a given URL, or use URLs from a different domain.
It's a good idea to provide a generic URL for geographically unspecified users if you have several alternate URLs targeted at users with the same language, but in different locales. For example, you may have specific URLs for English speakers in Ireland (en-ie), Canada (en-ca), and Australia (en-au), but want all other English speakers to see your generic English (en) page, and everyone else to see the homepage. In this case you should specify the generic English-language (en) page for searchers in, say, the UK. You can annotate this cluster of pages using a Sitemap file or using HTML link tags like this:
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-ie" hreflang="en-ie" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-ca" hreflang="en-ca" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-au" hreflang="en-au" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en" hreflang="en" />
For language/country selectors or auto-redirecting homepages, you should add an annotation for the hreflang value "x-default" as well:
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/" hreflang="x-default" />

Supported language values

The value of the hreflang attribute identifies the language (in ISO 639-1 format) and optionally the region (in ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 format) of an alternate URL. For example:
  • de: German content, independent of region
  • en-GB: English content, for GB users
  • de-ES: German content, for users in Spain
Do not specify a country code by itself! Google does not automatically derive the language from the country code. You can specify a language code by itself if you want to simplify your tagging.  Adding the country code after the language to restrict the page to a specific region.  Examples:
  • be: Belarusian language, independent of region (not Belgium French)
  • nl-be: Dutch for Belgium
  • fr-be: French for Belgium 
For language script variations, the proper script is derived from the country. For example, when using zh-TW for users zh-TW, the language script is automatically derived (in this example: Chinese-Traditional). You can also specify the script itself explicitly using ISO 15924, like this:
  • zh-Hant: Chinese (Traditional)
  • zh-Hans: Chinese (Simplified)
Alternatively, you can also specify a combination of script and region—for example, usezh-Hans-TW to specify Chinese (Simplified) for Taiwanese users.
Finally, the reserved value "x-default" is used for indicating language selectors/redirectors which are not specific to one language or region, e.g. your homepage showing a clickable map of the world.

Common Mistakes

Important: Make sure that your provided hreflang value is actually valid. Take special care in regard to the two most common mistakes:
In general you are advised to sign up with your site to Webmaster Tools. This enables you to receive messages in regard to wrong annotations.
Example Widgets, Inc has a website that serves users in the USA, Great Britain, and Germany. The following URLs contain substantially the same content, but with regional variations:
  • http://www.example.com/ Default page that doesn't target any language or locale; may have selectors to let users pick their language and region.
  • http://en.example.com/page.html English-language homepage. Contains information about fees for shipping internationally from the USA.
  • http://en-gb.example.com/page.html English-language; displays prices in pounds sterling.
  • http://en-us.example.com/page.html English-language; displays prices in US dollars.
  • http://de.example.com/seite.html German-language version of the content
rel="alternate" hreflang="x" is used as a page level, not a site level, and you need to mark up each set of pages, including the home page, as appropriate. You can specify as many content variations and language/regional clusters as you need.
To indicate to Google that you want the German version of the page to be served to searchers using Google in German, the en-us version to searchers using google.com in English, and the en-gb version to searchers using google.co.uk in English, userel="alternate" hreflang="x" to identify alternate language versions.
Update the HTML of each URL in the set by adding a set of rel="alternate" hreflang="x" link elements. For the default page that doesn’t target any specific language or locale, add rel="alternate" hreflang="x-default":
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="x-default" href="http://www.example.com/" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-gb" href="http://en-gb.example.com/page.html" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-us" href="http://en-us.example.com/page.html" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en" href="http://en.example.com/page.html" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="de" href="http://de.example.com/seite.html" />
This markup tells Google's algorithm to consider all of these pages as alternate versions of each other.

Thursday, 23 January 2014

Complete Guide on KML Geography Sitemaps

If your business has a physical location, you would need to tell Google about it, not only to gain higher authority and credibility, but to better rank on the results page.

Standard SEO requires that a website should have a sitemap.xml file to help search engine robots (i.e. GoogleBot) to crawl a site and index it.

Sitemaps concept has evolved that we currently have several types of specific sitemaps; news sitemaps, Video sitemaps, and geography sitemaps.

Geography sitemap file may also called KML (Keyhole Markup Language) [Do you remember the days when Google Earth was called Keyhole? Well, that is it]

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML notation for expressing geographic annotation and visualization within Internet-based, two-dimensional maps and three-dimensional Earth browsers.

KML was developed for use with Google Earth, which was originally named Keyhole Earth Viewer. It was created by Keyhole, Inc, which was acquired by Google in 2004. KML became an international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium in 2008. Google Earth was the first program able to view and graphically edit KML files.

geography sitemaps image KML file


You can create KML files with the Google Earth user interface, or you can use an XML or simple text editor to enter "raw" KML from scratch. 

KML files and their related images (if any) can be compressed using the ZIP format into KMZ archives. To share your KML and KMZ files, you can e-mail them, host them locally for sharing within a private internet, or host them publicly on a web server. Just as web browsers display HTML files, Earth browsers such as Google Earth display KML files. 

Once you've properly configured your server and shared the URL (address) of your KML files, anyone who's installed Google Earth can view the KML files hosted on your public web server. Many applications display KML, including Google Earth, Google Maps, Google Maps for mobile, NASA WorldWind, ESRI ArcGIS Explorer, Adobe PhotoShop, AutoCAD, and Yahoo! Pipes.

The KML file specifies a set of features (place marks, images, polygons, 3D models, textual descriptions, etc.) for display in Here Maps, Google Earth, Maps and Mobile, or any other geospatial software implementing the KML encoding. Each place always has a longitude and a latitude. 

Other data can make the view more specific, such as tilt, heading, altitude, which together define a "camera view" along with a timestamp or timespan. KML shares some of the same structural grammar as GML. Some KML information cannot be viewed in Google Maps or Mobile.

KML files are very often distributed in KMZ files, which are zipped KML files with a .kmz extension. These must be legacy (ZIP 2.0) compression compatible (i.e. stored or deflate method), otherwise the .kmz file might not uncompress in all geobrowsers. The contents of a KMZ file are a single root KML document (notionally "doc.kml") and optionally any overlays, images, icons, and COLLADA 3D models referenced in the KML including network-linked KML files. The root KML document by convention is a file named "doc.kml" at the root directory level, which is the file loaded upon opening. By convention the root KML document is at root level and referenced files are in subdirectories (e.g. images for overlay images).

An example KML document is:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<kml xmlns="http://www.HaveResults.net/kml/2.2">
<Document>
<Placemark>
  <name>Have Results</name>
  <description>SEM Tools Reviews</description>
  <Point>
    <coordinates>-74.006393,40.714172,0</coordinates>
  </Point>
</Placemark>
</Document>
</kml>

 or could be more detailed like this (in Microformats):


<div class="vcard">
<h2 class="fn org">Have Results</h2>
<div class="adr">
<div class="street-address">adress</div>
<span class="locality">City</span>,
<span class="region">Quebec</span>
<span class="postal-code">123456</span>
<span class="country-name">Canada</span>
</div>
<div class="tel">00123456789</div>
</div>



or in Schema.org format:


<div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/LocalBusiness">
<h2><span itemprop="name">Have Results</span></h2>
<span itemprop="description">SEM Tools Reviews</span>
<div itemprop="address" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PostalAddress">
<span itemprop="streetAddress">adress</span>
<span itemprop="addressLocality">city</span>,
<span itemprop="addressRegion">Province</span>
</div>
Phone: <span itemprop="telephone">00123456789</span>
</div>




You can now create a file with KML extension for the Geo sitemap. 
To notify Google of the whereabouts of your locations, proceed by taking the following steps:
  1. Upload the KML file to your domain server with FTP.
  2. Login to Google Webmaster Tools and add the Geo Sitemap. For more information about submitting the Geo Sitemap, please read the Google Help pages.
  3. Don't forget to add your address details to your website 


There are easier ways to add your GEO sitemap (KML file to your site) 

If you are using WordPress, install a plugin called WP GeoSitemap
If not, you can use the geo sitemap generator to create you a file and you just upload it and notify Google through GWMTs. (Here is the link: http://www.geositemapgenerator.com/) 


Resources:

  • https://developers.google.com/kml/documentation/
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyhole_Markup_Language
  • https://developers.google.com/kml/documentation/kml_tut
  • https://support.google.com/earth/answer/148118?hl=en
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geography_Markup_Language



Tuesday, 17 December 2013

Understanding Google In-Depth Articles' Market Share

In-depth articles are typically long-form content from major publications, but, unlike news results, they may be months or years old. Google seems to be targeting “evergreen” resources, focusing on proven articles from trusted publications.

While some marketers have received excellent traffic bumps from in-depth articles, they’ve had to compete against some major websites. It appears that in-depth articles are actually slanted to favor larger, more established sites, at least according to a Forbes article by Dr. Peter J. Meyers and Denis Pinsky written earlier this year. They found 10 websites accounted for nearly 65 percent of the results for in-depth articles.



Here are the top 10 sites dominating the in-depth results.

  1. nytimes.com — 25.3 percent
  2. wsj.com — 8.0 percent
  3. newyorker.com — 5.7 percent
  4. theatlantic.com — 5.6 percent
  5. wired.com — 4.2 percent
  6. slate.com — 3.9 percent
  7. businessweek.com — 3.7 percent
  8. thedailybeast.com — 3.3 percent
  9. forbes.com — 2.8 percent
  10. nymag.com — 2.7 percent

Top 25 Phrases with In-depth
  1. jobs
  2. ancestry
  3. wedding dresses
  4. shoes
  5. toms
  6. 50 shades of grey
  7. laptop
  8. halloween costumes
  9. diabetes
  10. smartphone
  11. bruce springsteen
  12. pregnancy
  13. led
  14. tablet pc
  15. depression
  16. tory burch
  17. global warming
  18. laptops
  19. cruises
  20. car sales
  21. travel
  22. mba
  23. apartments
  24. router
  25. stock market

Not all Categories are Equal

Meyers and Pinsky also discovered that in-depth articles don’t appear as frequently for some topics as they do for others. Here’s a list of topics, and what percent of searches within those topics triggered an in-depth article box:

  1. Family & Community — 14.4 percent
  2. Health — 12.8 percent
  3. Law & Government — 12.0 percent
  4. Arts & Entertainment — 7.2 percent
  5. Finance — 7.0 percent
  6. Jobs & Education — 5.8 percent
  7. Hobbies & Leisure — 5.6 percent
  8. Computers & Consumer Electronics — 4.8 percent
  9. Internet & Telecom — 4.4 percent
  10. Food & Groceries — 3.6 percent
  11. Home & Garden — 3.2 percent
  12. Sports & Fitness — 3.2 percent
  13. Travel & Tourism — 3.2 percent
  14. Dining & Nightlife — 3.0 percent
  15. Real Estate — 3.0 percent
  16. Apparel — 2.8 percent
  17. Beauty & Personal Care — 1.6 percent
  18. Retailers & General Merchandise — 1.4 percent
  19. Vehicles — 1.2 percent
  20. Occasions & Gifts — 0.8 percent

If you want more traffic and you’re in a category that’s low on this list, in-depth articles might give your search traffic a major boost.

Tuesday, 10 December 2013

Store Locator and Local SEO Plugin for Wordpress

Yoast has just released a major update to its Local SEO plugin. This new version has some new functionality; most important is the new store locator option. 

This option is especially handy if your company has multiple locations or your brand is sold in many different stores. 

The store locator will allow customers to easily find the nearest location of your company. 

Customers can fill in their home address and a list of the nearest locations of your company will appear! 

Check out the new functionality and buy the Local SEO plugin!

This Local SEO plugin largely improves the usability of the contact page of your website. It allows you to:
SEOlocal_icoon_mapsInsert Google Maps - This extra functionality will make it easier for your customers to  (physically) navigate to the location of your company.
SEOlocal_icoon_adressInsert address(es) of your company - Our Local SEO plugin makes it easy to show your company address(es) in a clear and uniform format, while adding all the necessary technical markup for search engines.
SEOlocal_icoon_openinghoursInsert opening hours of your company - Our Local SEO plugin makes it easy to show your opening hours in a clear and uniform format.
SEOlocal_icoon_storelocatorInsert a store locator - The store locator will allow customers to easily find the nearest location of your company. Customers can fill in their home address and a list of the nearest locations of your company will appear.


Wednesday, 4 December 2013

How to Optimize your site for Google "In-depth articles" feature?

Often when you're searching on Google for a person or organization name, or other broad topic, you'll find a block of search results labeled "In-depth articles." These results provide high-quality content to help you learn about or explore a subject. While the feature is based on algorithmic signals, there are steps you can take as a webmaster to help Google find your high-quality, in-depth content and best present it to users in the search results page. 

Search result showing in-depth articles feature.


Optimize your site for the "In-depth articles" feature

Schema.org Article markup

In general, we'll do our best to understand the metadata you provide for your pages to better present search results to users. For this feature, it's particularly helpful if you can implement certain aspects of the schema.org Article markup, notably the following attributes:
  • headline
  • alternativeHeadline
  • image (note: the image must be crawlable and indexable)
  • description
  • datePublished
  • articleBody

Authorship markup

Authorship markup helps our algorithms to find and present relevant authors and experts in Google search results. Learn more about authorship.

Pagination and canonicalization

For multi-part content, proper pagination markup using rel=next and rel=prev can help our algorithms correctly identify the extent of those articles. In addition, it’s important that canonicalization is done correctly, with a rel=canonical pointing at either each individual page, or a “view-all” page (and not to page 1 of a multi-part series). Learn more about pagination and canonicalization.

Logos

A logo is a great way help users recognize the source of an article with a quick glance. As a webmaster, there are two ways you can give Google a hint about which logo to use for your website:
  1. Create a Google+ Page and link it to your website. Choose an official logo or icon as the default image.
  2. Use organization markup to specify your logo.
Note that it may take some time for logo changes to be reflected in search results.

Restricted Content & First Click Free

If you offer subscription-based access to your website content, or if users must register for access, then search engines may not be able to access some of your site's most relevant content. If Google can't properly crawl and index your content (including text, images and videos), we can't show it in our search results (including the "In-depth articles" feature). Implementing First Click Free is one easy way to make sure your content is accessible to Google's search crawlers so it can be displayed in Google search results. Learn more about First Click Free.

WordPress In-Depth Article Generator

If you are using WordPress for your Blog, there is a plugin that you can install to Generate posts metadata for your pages to better present search results to users. Download it from Here

Wednesday, 24 July 2013

21 Quick SEO Ways to Get Ranked and Penalized

Here is a list of what is called "Black Hat SEO" or Methods to fool search engines to make your website rank better even if it does not have a value.


I am giving you this list so simply you do not use its methods if any of them came to your mind and you think you are smart and will fool Google. Most probably, you won't and you might too get penalized.





Have Fun!


  1. Article Spinning
  2. Site Scraping
  3. Site Mirroring
  4. Doorway Pages
  5. Link Farms or Sybil Attacks
  6. Automated Content Stuffing
  7. URL Redirection
  8. Paid Links to pass PageRank
  9. Cloaking
  10. Keyword Stuffing
  11. Blog Spam
  12. Low Value Contnet
  13. Meta Tag Keyword Stuffing
  14. Multiple H1 tags
  15. Abuse of automated query tools
  16. Over Optimization
  17. using the same keyword in all anchor texts
  18. Site-wide links (footer links)
  19. Links from Foreign Language Sites
  20. Excessive Link Velocity
  21. Hiding links in CSS and JavaScript files  



Source: 25 ways to get penalized in 2012

Tuesday, 4 June 2013

Easy MicroFormats Creator (the Schema maker)

After it is now known for everybody that Rich Snippets or microformats (Or Schema Or Structured Data) is essential for your website, the only problem SEOers are having now is how to do it easily without having to go to shema.org and generate the tag.

Google, as usual, came up with the killer tool, that they called, Structured Data Helper, where you simply select a data type (articles, movies, events, products, etc.), then paste the URL or HTML source of the page you wish to mark up. The tool will load your URL, and will give you a highligher, to highlight each section of this page and select its Meta Type (author, image, rating, article body, URL, etc.)

That's how the tool looks like: 


Thursday, 18 April 2013

Today I Learned: How to add Google+ Comments to My Blog

Google+ Comments is an alternative to the default commenting system on Blogger, available to blog authors who have upgraded their Blogger profile to Google+. Google+ Comments lets you bring the following conversations together in one place, right under your blog post:


  • Comments made on your Blogger blog post
  • Comments on the blog post that you’ve shared to Google+
  • Shared content on Google+ that links to your blog post
  • Readers will need a Google+ page or profile to comment on your blog.


Features of Google+ Comments

Google+ Comments look similar to traditional Blogger comments, but have some important differences. For example:


  • When you leave a comment on a blog, you'll see the option, checked by default, to also share that comment to Google+.
  • Google+ posts that link to blog posts will show up as a comment underneath those blog posts
  • If original comment is shared to Google+, replies to the comment on the blog will show up in Google+ and vice versa, but only to the people that the original comment was shared with
  • If a comment is not shared with the blog author, the blog author will not be able to see the comment in either location
  • As the author of a post, you’ll receive Google+ notifications when readers comment on or share your blog post.


Here is How to add your Google Plus Comments to Your Blog


  1. Sign in to Blogger
  2. Click on the “Google+” tab in your blog’s Dashboard
  3. Upgrade to Google+ if you haven’t already done so
  4. Enable Google+ Comments. Comments already made on your posts will keep working in the new widget.



How to Associate your blog with your Google+ profile?


If you blog under your common name (eg. “Jane Smith’s blog”), you’ll find that associating your blog with your personal Google+ profile may increase your blog’s discoverability and make it easier to form communities with other bloggers and readers.

When you link your blog to your Google+ profile, you can share posts directly from Blogger to your personal stream.

You can change your blog’s association with your Google+ profile to an association with a Google+ page via the Google+ tab on Blogger.

Associating your blog with your +Page

If your blog is a brand (eg. “The Coffee Bar”), you can link your blog to a Google+ page. By creating a page for your blog you’ll find that linking your blog to your Google+ page may increase its discoverability and make it easier to form communities with other bloggers and readers.

When you link your blog to your Google+ page, you can share posts directly from Blogger to your page. If you associate your blog with a Google+ page, any Blogger gadgets that originally pointed to your Google+ profile will then point to your Google+ page. The same is true if you switch from a page to a profile.

If your blog is currently associated with a page, and you would like to link it to your Google+ profile or another page you own, you can do so via the Google+ tab on Blogger.

Blogging under your Blogger display name

If you don’t want to connect your blog to Google+, you can still continue to blog under your Blogger display name. Remember that you can have a Google+ profile or page even if you choose to have a Blogger display name -- the difference is that the two won’t be linked externally.

Wednesday, 17 April 2013

A Meta Keywords Tag Just For News Articles

The news metatag essentially gives publishers some freedom to be more creative in their headlines and article copy, and not have to worry about cramming keywords in everything they publish. 

Google says that the purpose of this feature is to empower news writers to express their stories freely while helping Google News to properly understand and classify that content so that it’s discoverable by our wide audience of users.
Similar in spirit to the plain keywords metatag, the news_keywords metatag lets publishers specify a collection of terms that apply to a news article. These words don’t need to appear anywhere within the headline or body text.

How to use the News metakeywords Tag? 

Google's crawler makes use of that Google-specific metatag to help determine how to best classify your content. By implementing the news_keywords metatag you can specify which keywords are most relevant to your articles. 

For example, in an article about the World Cup you could add the following code to help Google News better understand the nature of your content:

<meta name="news_keywords" content="World Cup, Brazil 2014, Spain vs Netherlands">


Keywords could also be used to help disambiguate between related terms. Again, if this particular publisher wanted to specify that this article reported on soccer’s World Cup -- as opposed to rugby’s World Cup -- then they could try the following:

<meta name="news_keywords" content="World Cup, Brazil 2014, Spain vs Netherlands, soccer, football">

Use a comma to separate each phrase or group of keywords. (Commas are the only punctuation allowed in the field.) You can add up to ten phrases for a given article, and all keywords are given equal value. For instance, the first keyword is not considered a stronger signal than the tenth keyword.

Please keep in mind that Google use a number of signals to determine ranking in addition to the prominence of certain keywords.

Ranking in Google News is determined based on a number of factors, including:
  • Freshness of content
  • Diversity of content
  • Rich textual content
  • Originality of content
In addition to these guidelines, there are some technical factors that could affect the ranking of your site in Google News. These factors include other relevant sites linking to your site and descriptive and accurate<title> and <alt> tags in your articles' code.