Showing posts with label SERP. Show all posts
Showing posts with label SERP. Show all posts

Tuesday, 17 December 2013

Understanding Google In-Depth Articles' Market Share

In-depth articles are typically long-form content from major publications, but, unlike news results, they may be months or years old. Google seems to be targeting “evergreen” resources, focusing on proven articles from trusted publications.

While some marketers have received excellent traffic bumps from in-depth articles, they’ve had to compete against some major websites. It appears that in-depth articles are actually slanted to favor larger, more established sites, at least according to a Forbes article by Dr. Peter J. Meyers and Denis Pinsky written earlier this year. They found 10 websites accounted for nearly 65 percent of the results for in-depth articles.



Here are the top 10 sites dominating the in-depth results.

  1. nytimes.com — 25.3 percent
  2. wsj.com — 8.0 percent
  3. newyorker.com — 5.7 percent
  4. theatlantic.com — 5.6 percent
  5. wired.com — 4.2 percent
  6. slate.com — 3.9 percent
  7. businessweek.com — 3.7 percent
  8. thedailybeast.com — 3.3 percent
  9. forbes.com — 2.8 percent
  10. nymag.com — 2.7 percent

Top 25 Phrases with In-depth
  1. jobs
  2. ancestry
  3. wedding dresses
  4. shoes
  5. toms
  6. 50 shades of grey
  7. laptop
  8. halloween costumes
  9. diabetes
  10. smartphone
  11. bruce springsteen
  12. pregnancy
  13. led
  14. tablet pc
  15. depression
  16. tory burch
  17. global warming
  18. laptops
  19. cruises
  20. car sales
  21. travel
  22. mba
  23. apartments
  24. router
  25. stock market

Not all Categories are Equal

Meyers and Pinsky also discovered that in-depth articles don’t appear as frequently for some topics as they do for others. Here’s a list of topics, and what percent of searches within those topics triggered an in-depth article box:

  1. Family & Community — 14.4 percent
  2. Health — 12.8 percent
  3. Law & Government — 12.0 percent
  4. Arts & Entertainment — 7.2 percent
  5. Finance — 7.0 percent
  6. Jobs & Education — 5.8 percent
  7. Hobbies & Leisure — 5.6 percent
  8. Computers & Consumer Electronics — 4.8 percent
  9. Internet & Telecom — 4.4 percent
  10. Food & Groceries — 3.6 percent
  11. Home & Garden — 3.2 percent
  12. Sports & Fitness — 3.2 percent
  13. Travel & Tourism — 3.2 percent
  14. Dining & Nightlife — 3.0 percent
  15. Real Estate — 3.0 percent
  16. Apparel — 2.8 percent
  17. Beauty & Personal Care — 1.6 percent
  18. Retailers & General Merchandise — 1.4 percent
  19. Vehicles — 1.2 percent
  20. Occasions & Gifts — 0.8 percent

If you want more traffic and you’re in a category that’s low on this list, in-depth articles might give your search traffic a major boost.

Tuesday, 10 December 2013

Store Locator and Local SEO Plugin for Wordpress

Yoast has just released a major update to its Local SEO plugin. This new version has some new functionality; most important is the new store locator option. 

This option is especially handy if your company has multiple locations or your brand is sold in many different stores. 

The store locator will allow customers to easily find the nearest location of your company. 

Customers can fill in their home address and a list of the nearest locations of your company will appear! 

Check out the new functionality and buy the Local SEO plugin!

This Local SEO plugin largely improves the usability of the contact page of your website. It allows you to:
SEOlocal_icoon_mapsInsert Google Maps - This extra functionality will make it easier for your customers to  (physically) navigate to the location of your company.
SEOlocal_icoon_adressInsert address(es) of your company - Our Local SEO plugin makes it easy to show your company address(es) in a clear and uniform format, while adding all the necessary technical markup for search engines.
SEOlocal_icoon_openinghoursInsert opening hours of your company - Our Local SEO plugin makes it easy to show your opening hours in a clear and uniform format.
SEOlocal_icoon_storelocatorInsert a store locator - The store locator will allow customers to easily find the nearest location of your company. Customers can fill in their home address and a list of the nearest locations of your company will appear.


Wednesday, 4 December 2013

Using the “The Skyscraper Technique” for SEO and Content Creation

This SEO technique is called 'he Skyscraper Method' because it shares the same logic of Skyscrapers; People always prefer the best of the best. and the highest of the high.

There are 3 basic steps to The Skyscraper Technique To Get Quality Links and Targeted Traffic:

Step 1: Find link-worthy content


Either by getting the top articles on Google SERP for your keyword, or by searching for the most shared pages of your competitors or Benchmarks (you can use MOZ's OpenSiteExplorer to get the pages with most backlinks for specific sites you believe have Skyscraper content.

Step 2: Make something even better


By converting keywords in your titles like (How to, Top, lists, Best, Free, Great, Why, Tips, etc.) and implementing SEO wisely, like using the KWs in the title tag, Header, and URL. also making your page mobile and social media friendly, using multimedia (images, and videos), or creating infographics. And of course making the page fast and clean.

Step 3: Reach out to the right people


There are many ways you can reach the right people for this sculptuerd piece of content. Just be creative. You can simply share this content manually with the websites you mentioned within your blog post, or searching for similar content on blogs, forums, or social media pages, and share it.



Wednesday, 11 September 2013

Email Marketing Tips Newsfeed







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Tuesday, 10 September 2013

Another Local SEO Tip

Another Local SEO Advise is to List your hours of operation on the home page and the Contact Us page

Search engines love this information, since it’s something that consumers specifically are looking for. In fact, Bing Local used to display little “Open” icons on business profile pages in some cases if they knew the business was open while a searcher viewed the page. 

For some types of businesses, there could be a high likelihood that search engines might change rankings according to the hours of operation, particularly on mobile devices, too. 

After all, it doesn't make sense to show a searcher all the restaurants that are closed at the moment as first in the list, right? 

A Local SEO Secret

If you run a Local business website and of course want to rank higher on SERPs, I am sure you will find this piece of advice useful to you:

Use a Local Phone Number not a 1-800-Number in your Contact us page
If you remember that search engines want to enhance their user experience by sending them to the most relevant site, they will remember to better position your site.

Thursday, 29 August 2013

Top Resources to Learn and Master SEO

Zach Bulygo created a list of 58 resources to help any one becoming an seo expert. I would love to share the list with you as it is truly handy not only for seo newbies but also for seniors as well.

But since it is 58, a strange number in fact, I will added 2 more resources to make it a complete SIXTY :) Is not Sharing Amazing?

Ok Here we are:

SEO 101

1. How Google Crawls – Discusses the basics of how Google crawls the web, indexes, and serves results.
2. How Google Works – If you want to get into SEO, you’ll need to understand the basics of how Google (and other) search engines work. This video provides a background on Google search.
3. Getting the Basics – If you want to get traffic from Google and rank well, you’ll need to have a site that Google views as high quality. It has certain signals that it uses to gauge a site’s quality. This article covers the basics of what attributes you’ll need.
4. PageRank – To understand the Google search engine and why some sites rank higher than others, you’ll need to have an understanding of PageRank. This Wikipedia article gives a good background. (It’s even referenced by Google employees.)
5. Quick Sprout’s Guide to SEO – A 9 chapter, infographic-style guide to SEO. A good resource if you don’t want to read a book but want something more thorough than a simple explanation.
6. Moz’s Guide to SEO – Don’t want to learn about SEO through long infographics? Then check out this 10 chapter guide written by the folks over at Moz.
7. SEO Starter Guide – Written by Google – A 32 page document which explains how to run SEO. This document was written by Google in 2010.
8. 8 First Step SEO Tips for Bloggers – Are you a blogger who wants to increase traffic to your website? Try reading this article first to get a good start on your SEO knowledge.
9. SEO Tips for Beginners – Are you a total novice when it comes to SEO? If so, read this short article which lists 5 things you can do right now to get you pointed in the right direction.

Free Tools

Quality, free tools – what could be better? Check them out:
10. Google Webmaster Tools – Before you look at any other tool, check out this suite of tools provided by Google. For help using Webmaster Tools, check out this page. Also check out Bing Webmaster Tools.
11. Open Site Explorer – Also known as the search engine for links, Open Site Explorer is a Moz creation. This tool allows you to see who links to your site, find links that point to old and broken pages, and research competitors to see who links to them. To check out the toolbar and view the product demo, check out this page. In order to understand this tool, you’ll need to be familiar with the termsPage Authority and Domain Authority. Note: this is a limited free tool. You can pay for enhanced access.
12. Microsoft SEO Toolkit – The Microsoft web team made an SEO tool. Check it out here.
13. Broken Link Finder – Having broken links lowers the quality of your website, which in turn hurts SEO. Find them and squash them with this free tool.
14. SEO Site Tools – An extension for Chrome that pulls up page rank, meta description, incoming links, and more for the site you’re visiting.
15. Keyword Suggestion Tool – A free tool (with an account) from SEO Book. Shows the number of searches for a specific keyword and gives suggestions.
16. Majestic SEO – A good tool for viewing backlinks to your website. Also check out Link Diagnosis.
17. Spider View Simulator – View your website the way a spider would. This will give your site a different perspective and may help you find and fix errors. Also check out their other tools.
18. Spider Test Tool – Similar tool as above, but this one is from SEO Book.
19. Robots.txt Checker – Errors in your robots.txt can cause problems for a spider’s ability to crawl your webpage. Find them with this free tool.
20. WordPress SEO Plugin – A popular plugin for WordPress. View the webpage to see a list of all the features.
21. Anchor Text Over Optimization – Google is cracking down on websites that are overly optimized for SEO. Part of that involves anchor text. This tool highlights where you may be at risk for anchor text over optimization.
22. Test Page Speed – Your website speed affects your page ranking, so you want to ensure your website loads as quickly as possible. This tool (from Google) will measure your site’s speed and offer suggestions for improving speed.
23. Google Trends – Shows volume of searches over time. A good tool to view keyword popularity.

Knowing the Status of Your Website

Want to know how optimized your website is for SEO? Check out these for help:
24. Anatomy of a Perfectly Optimized Web Page – Unsure of how to make an SEO optimized page? Or not sure if your page is optimized? Print out this graphic and hang it in your office.
25. Webmaster Guidelines – Take a while to read these guidelines and make sure your site is in compliance with Google. Don’t forget to check out the Link Schemesdocument, which has recently been updated. For a background on the update,check out this article.
26. Marketing Grader – HubSpot’s popular free tool gives you an overview of your marketing efforts, including an SEO analysis.

Tips and Tricks

By “tricks,” I don’t mean “If you just do x to your site, you’ll soar to the top!” That won’t work. These articles don’t promise anything of that nature. They give quality information for you to know:
27. Setting up an SEO Friendly WordPress Site – WordPress is a publishing platform that is used by millions of websites. Read this article if you have a WordPress site or want to get set up with one and are not too familiar with SEO.
28. SEO for Blogs – Don’t have a WordPress site but still want SEO for blogs? Have a WordPress site and want to learn about SEO for any kind of blog? If yes, check out this article.
29. Patrick McKenzie’s SEO Tricks – McKenzie provides some SEO tricks. Even if you’re advanced with SEO, it won’t hurt to read this.
30. Making Content Memorable – If you run a blog, it’s important to not put your time and energy into getting tweets, likes, +1′s, etc. Why? Because it’s still not totally clear how these play into Google’s ranking. You should be spending your time focusing on producing great content. This SEO Copywriting (SuccessWorks) article gives a good overview of how to turn an article from “meh” to memorable.
31. Strategic SEO for Startups – More good SEO tips from McKenzie, this time focusing on “Startup SEO.”
32. Quick Wins in SEO – Want some quick wins (that you may not be familiar with already) in SEO? Are you familiar with title tags and h2 tags? If not, check out this article. It’ll help bring some quick wins to your website.
33. SEO for Software Companies – Run a software company and want to know how to get traffic to your website via content creation? Check out this article for all the details.
34. SEO Tips from Gabriel Weinberg – Ever heard of the DuckDuckGo search engine? The creator of that search engine, Gabriel Weinberg, gives a few of his SEO tips here.
35. SEO for ecommerce – An 8 part article which delves into optimizing an ecommerce site for SEO.
36. Conducting a Competitive SEO Audit – HubSpot gives an overview of how to conduct an SEO audit of the competitive landscape.
37. What Every Programmer Should Know – Are you a developer that’s a little unsure about SEO? Read this article written by a developer explaining the ins and outs of SEO.
38. Best SEO Tactics Post-Panda – In February 2011, Google released a relatively significant update to its algorithm. The update was known as Panda and it hurt the traffic of a lot of sites. This Quora thread gives good tips for surviving and maintaining strong Google traffic in a post-Panda world.

Staying Updated

As mentioned, staying updated on Google algorithm changes is important. Of course, there are a few principles that are timeless and good policy. For example, maintaining a quality site with accurate information is top priority, because content is king. These things won’t change.
But being aware of any changes or updates to the Google guidelines and complying with what they’re looking for is required, too. These resources will help you do that. They also contain solid advice that you can use for your SEO efforts. Add these blogs to your RSS reader to stay on top of all things SEO:
39. Google Webmaster Central Blog – The official Google blog for all things related to its search. Written for webmasters.
40. Google Algorithm Changelog – A good, unofficial resource where you can find the change history to the Google algorithm.
41. Google Webmaster YouTube Channel – Frequently updated with a Q&A from Matt Cutts. If anything about SEO is a “must watch,” it’s this. No speculation, no conjecture, just accurate information from a key employee on Google’s search team.
42. Moz Blog – A variety of topics in the SEO arena are covered. Features a variety of guest bloggers.
43. KISSmetrics SEO posts – A collection of SEO articles that have been posted to the KISSmetrics blog.
44. Search Engine Land – This homepage has lots of good articles related to SEO.
45. Dave Naylor – Dave Naylor is well respected in the SEO industry. Read his blog to get the latest insights.
46. HubSpot SEO Posts – A collection of posts HubSpot has relating to SEO.
47. SEO Book Blog – Aaron Wall is well known in the SEO community. This is his blog, which is part of his site.
48. Search Engine Journal – Gives you tips while also providing some industry news and commentary.
49. SEO Roundtable – Provides a good overview on SEO news.
50. YouMoz – Blog posts written by the Moz community.
51. Search Engine Guide – Contains lots of intriguing and educational posts..
52. Alltop SEO – A continuously updated collection of all the top posts from a variety of SEO blogs.

Getting Inside the SEO Industry

Want to engage and communicate with SEO enthusiasts? Check out these resources:
53. Webmaster Central Forum – A large forum hosted by Google where you can get help with SEO issues.
54. Moz Community – A community hosted by Moz that features a Q&A, articles written by others in the community, and webinars.
55. SEO Subreddit – An SEO community in Reddit. Features news, Q&A, case studies, and more.

Get Help

In addition to getting help with the 3 resources mentioned above, you can also try these paid methods:
56. Talk with an Expert – Need to talk to someone for help or advice with SEO? Check out the experts available on Clarity.
57. SEO Book Community – A popular SEO community. It does require a paid account of $300 a month.
58. Inbound – A Hacker News-like discussion board where many inbound marketing issues are covered. There’s a heavy focus on SEO here.

To Make them 60


Good LucK! 








Do your Webpages Speak The SEOish Language? Another Infographic

The Seoish Language School

An ideal webpage that search engines will love and favor over the billions of other sites is the one that respects it and speaks with its robots' language (the SEOish).

It is also a page that understands that SERPs algorithms is about User Experience and Value Proposition.

webpage speaks seoish




How to Select My site's Targeted Keywords | Infographic

When it comes to SEO, it is mostly about Keywords. But which Keywords do you want to target and which phrases do you want to be ranked for? is your Keyword "Free Songs" or "Free Songs by School boys in their summer vacation in Mexico"? what are the cons and pros for both?

Answering these questions is not that easy as it needs an analytic strategy that your whole website will be built on.


  • You need to know how to define your business
  • Who are your audiences and what is their search behavior
  • Your targeted cities and Countries
  • Your targeted visitor' language
  • and Who are your competitors


Why do Not you have a look on this infographic instead:



See the embed code for this infographic at Promodo.

Tuesday, 20 August 2013

Getting My CV Ranked on Top of Google and Search Engines with SEO



A very simple White Hat SEO method to get your LinkedIn Profile (CV) on the First Page of Google SERP (Search Engine Results Page).



Hurry up and use this method before Google change its Algorithm!!

The idea is Simple, since LinkedIn has a higher PageRank than any other website, so Google favor it over them on any common Key Phrases (especially when you have it on the title) ofcourse you can add it also on the Linkedin Public Profile permalink, but I would not recommend it unless you do not care about personalizing it.


Tuesday, 6 August 2013

SEO IS NOT For SALE!

by: +Mina Adly Younan

SEO has now become a Trend.



Everybody knows about it, and many think of it as some redundant easy tasks. It is indeed easy, but it needs a talent. Only the gifted can be an SEO Specialist.

SEO requires creativity, flexibility, and a high sense of giving and sharing knowledge with people. 

The age is over when people used to think of SEO as stuffing all Keywords' synonyms in a page then hiring backlinkers whom only work is to submit a link on whatever site allows it.

seo not for sale text logo


Unfortunately, most of SEO firms sell SEO, the easy way, The "By The Book" way. They Do not know that SEO is NOT For SALE. It is an art that get rewarded for its results.

I like the marketing material for an SEO Company called UniSEO (Not UNESCO) as they tells you  how to tell if an SEO firm is conning you:

  • Try to sell you SEO packages by the keyword. That is one of the biggest cons in SEO history. It demonstrates a complete lack of understanding of your needs. Real SEO is a lot more than a keyword term.
  • Try to sell you a link package with "1000's of links." It's a fact that doing so may result in your entire website being banned from Google. Further, these companies do not care about you, your business, or your future. They care about taking your money. That's it.
  • Refuse to explain what they did, what you paid for, and how to track results.
  • Google.com and Google.ca are both very important. If the company insists that having a high ranking on Google.ca is the only thing that matters, you're being conned.
  • During a sales call, they try to dazzle you with lots of high numbers that mean nothing to you but sound impressive (like "we'll buy 1,000 links for you", "according to Google, 10,000 people searched for your keyword term last month", "you'll get thousands of hits right away").
  • During the sales call they tell you exactly what you want to hear: "You will easily make tons of money".
  • Insist on building a few landing pages for thousands of dollars, irrespective of the many other issues that might be wrong with your site (such as an old, dated web design, a difficult to use navigation menu, and so on).
  • Give you wishy-washy information so you never really understand the basics of the science or art of SEO. If they are trying to bamboozle you, it's likely because they don't know what they're talking about or they are trying to cover up the fact that they've mislead you.


SEO in a red bag



Those businesses are not really SEO companies. They may look and sound like SEO companies, but they aren't. In fact, they are scammers who could care less about you. We're telling you this because we're "one of the good guys" and we look out for our clients' best interests. We look at the full, long-term picture.


Thursday, 1 August 2013

Presentation on The History of Search Engines - Slideshow and Infographics

The History of Search Engines and SEO goes back to the 1990 and is getting upgraded in a very vast speed. In this Slide show you will see how it starts, what techniques people used to do to rank on search engines and how hard and technical it was until google updated its algorithms and made SEO more about content, Value, and User Experience.
The slide show is 101 slides, but I promise you will find it very interesting and informative and won't take you more than 30 minutes.


And Here is the Infographic 



Top search engines


And Another One Too 



Search Engine History
Infographic: Search Engine History by Infographiclabs

Wednesday, 31 July 2013

Where to Start SEO for New Websites - 30 Things to Do

By +Mina Adly Younan
You plan to create a new website for your business? Everybody is talking about SEO and you want to employ it but you do not know where to start from?

Here is a Checklist of 30 things you should think of when you start a new website to make it Search Engine Optimized as well as User Friendly and Engaging.



  1. If it is a Local Business website buy a local TLD (.ca) and direct the (.com) to it
  2. Homepage and inner pages' titles are the identity of the site and they should be a well selected combination of the targeted message and Keywords  
  3. Meta Description, and Headers should reflect each page’s message and value proposed
  4. The URLs has to be readable
  5. The Content has to be engaging, trending, well-designed, Tightly themed on all pages, and user friendly
  6. The 404 page has to be customized, navigable, and engaging
  7. Create Robots.txt
  8. Create Sitemap.xml
  9. Submit the site to Google Webmasters
  10. Submit the Site to Bing Webmasters
  11. Create an analytics account
  12. Link Analytics with Webmasters tool
  13. Index the pages to Google and Bing
  14. If it is a WordPress Site, install SEO plugins (like Yoast)
  15. Make sure that the Domain is purchased for more than 2 years (10 years is the Best)
  16. If it is a Local business, submit to Google Places
  17. Create a French Version for a Luxury Canadian Brand
  18. Create a Mobile Version
  19. IP canonicalization and www resolve
  20. Create Social Media Pages (FB, Twitter, YT, LinkedIn) and link them to the site
  21. Submit to DMOZ
  22. Submit to Local Directories
  23. Create and Publish a PR on the new website launch (it is recommended if it is a paid PR like on PRweb or MediaWire)
  24. Submit to Industry/Business-related Directories (The higher their PR the better ranking the site will get)
  25. Submit RSS Feeds and Ping related networks and search engines
  26. Invest in targeted PPC campaigns to reveal the brand to the fans
  27. Invest in a Social Media Marketing to start with social media fans base to create the buzz
  28. Start a blog and share its content on Social Media
  29. Monitor and Optimize
  30. Design and Content A/B Testing 

SEO for Under construction websites


Wednesday, 24 July 2013

21 Quick SEO Ways to Get Ranked and Penalized

Here is a list of what is called "Black Hat SEO" or Methods to fool search engines to make your website rank better even if it does not have a value.


I am giving you this list so simply you do not use its methods if any of them came to your mind and you think you are smart and will fool Google. Most probably, you won't and you might too get penalized.





Have Fun!


  1. Article Spinning
  2. Site Scraping
  3. Site Mirroring
  4. Doorway Pages
  5. Link Farms or Sybil Attacks
  6. Automated Content Stuffing
  7. URL Redirection
  8. Paid Links to pass PageRank
  9. Cloaking
  10. Keyword Stuffing
  11. Blog Spam
  12. Low Value Contnet
  13. Meta Tag Keyword Stuffing
  14. Multiple H1 tags
  15. Abuse of automated query tools
  16. Over Optimization
  17. using the same keyword in all anchor texts
  18. Site-wide links (footer links)
  19. Links from Foreign Language Sites
  20. Excessive Link Velocity
  21. Hiding links in CSS and JavaScript files  



Source: 25 ways to get penalized in 2012

Thursday, 11 July 2013

One Page Website Vs. Multiple Pages Website: Which is More Engaging? With Examples of Best Single Page Sites I found

We all grew up in an internet world where sites have pages to look like books. But those who created that trend forgot that books 'have to' consist of many pages to be easier for the readers to hold them, put them in their bags, bookmark where they reached, and above all save space. 


But do you know that before books people used to write long content in a very long manuscripts that they used to roll. It was not handy of course and made life very complicated for readers back then. But let’s face it, reading was more appreciated and people were more engaged to the read content. Right? It was not about how many pages did I read today but what did I in terms of chapters or books or ideas.

When it comes to the internet, our modern source of information, we use websites to nourish our minds. Do we want content on these websites to be engaging and fluid or we want to navigate between pages, sections, and categories? 
The answer to that is not easy nor simple. Because it depends on what content do you have and how do you want to present it and above all who is your target audience.

But the Key is: 

YOU WANT TO KEEP THE FLOW! and DON'T WANT TO BREAK THE NARRATION while being well-indexed on search engines and have easy on site navigation


‘Single page themes’ / ‘One Page Website’?  

The websites in this article let you scroll, but they also provide alternative ways of finding cues and means for getting around. In several cases the designs encourage exploration, which is both more engaging and also teaches you how to navigate at the same time.
Timeline on Jess and Russ's website.

Jess and Russ

The Jess and Russ’s website is a wedding invitation, though it’s also something more. As it says at the top of the page, it is the story of Jess and Russ leading up to this moment. It’s a narrative that begins with a few details before they had met, leads to their meeting and falling in love, and culminates with the invitation (complete with RSVP form).
Jess and Russ's RSVP.
How do you navigate a story that’s told linearly through time? Sure, there are flashbacks and other narrative devices, but for the most part you tell the story from beginning to end. You move through it in a straight line and so here the navigation is simply scrolling through the page. Nothing more is needed.
I started this post suggesting we could provide more than scrolling. This example shows that, at times, scrolling is the most appropriate way to navigate. Jess and Russ’s website could easily have been broken up into several pages (navigated through the “next” and “previous” links at the bottom and top of each page). That would still keep things moving linearly, though each click would momentarily disrupt the narrative. In this case scrolling was the better choice.
Fortunately the website makes us want to scroll. Along the way we get an engaging story, filled with wonderful artwork and with interesting parallax effects. With this website you won’t get bored scrolling — instead, you’ll be looking forward to the next part of the story and how it will be told.
Artwork from Jess and Russ's website.
The story your design is telling may not be as linear as this one, though it’s likely parts of it will be. The lesson from Jess and Russ is that when you’re designing the linear parts of a website and you want people to move through it in a single direction, scrolling is possibly the best option. You also may want to consider a single, longer page as opposed to several shorter ones that are connected by links.

Ballantyne

Ballantyne creates luxury knitwear from cashmere. The website itself contains different types of information. There is the standard “About Us” and “Contact” information, as a start. Beyond that there are product images and chunks of text to go along with the images. It’s easy to imagine yourself thumbing through the pages of a catalog when browsing through this website.
As with Jess and Russ, this website is entirely on a single page, and as such, scrolling is once again a predominant way to navigate. It’s not the only way this time, though it’s perhaps the more interesting method.
Ballantyne.
On the landing section for the domain there are links that read “Established 1921″ and “Contacts”. Clicking the former scrolls the page up to see the “Who We Are” section (the “About Us” info) above. The latter scrolls you through all the images and text to the bottom of the page as well as the contact information.
When arriving at either of these ends of the website you’re also presented with additional ways to navigate. The “Who We Are” part of the page contains an “X” to close it, though this information doesn’t actually open or close — it just scrolls you back to the main landing section for the page, which you can also do yourself.
At the top of the contact section of the page a header drops down containing the company name and the links for “Who We Are” and “Contacts”. Unfortunately, the company name isn’t clickable, which is conventional for navigating back to a home location.
You can equally scroll through these two end sections of the page. As you do, there’s a nice parallax effect. The outer two columns scroll as you’d expect, while the middle column scrolls in the opposite direction. The effect creates additional interest beyond simple scrolling as more information and imagery pass through your view. The two header links along with the company name are also present as soon as you scroll below the root landing spot.
Contact section on Ballantyne website.
As with Jess and Russ, the Ballantyne website is more enjoyable to scroll than most. Here we’re also given an alternative means of navigation in addition to scrolling. There are a few problems, though:

  • No link is provided to navigate back to the original landing location. You have to scroll to get there, or first go to the Who We Are section and close it. This seems odd.
  • Clicking to either “Who We Are” or “Contacts” isn’t quite a smooth experience.
  • There’s no way to scroll up to the “Who We Are” section.
  • The link at the landing location to “Who We Are” reads “Established 1921″ and isn’t clear where it leads.
Another minor complaint is while scrolling, the images don’t always align where you’d like them to — you see a full image in one column, but not the others. This might have been done on purpose to get you to scroll slowly through the website, but I kept wanting things to align better. While it won’t affect your experience of the website, it can be a little jarring.
Even though the above items could be improved, they hardly cause problems when navigating the website. We’re talking about a limited amount of content, and within a moment or two, you’ve figured out where everything is. While clicking to the end locations isn’t the smoothest experience, seeing everything scroll from one end to the other does show you quickly how to navigate the entire website. In fact, it’s this behavior that cues you in if you didn’t immediately realize to scroll.
The lesson here is that even if your page will most likely be scrolled, you can still provide alternate options to navigate and help people understand what’s located on the page.

Cadillac ATS vs The World

Unlike the two websites above, Cadillac is a website with a couple of separate pages. Here we’ll look at one section of the website, specifically one page within that section. One of the ways Cadillac is promoting the ATS is as a vehicle that can take you anywhere and exhilarate you as it does.
The designers have set up a section of the website where you can explore four interesting locations around the world that you might not ordinarily get to see. It’s these location pages that we will consider here.
Cadillac ATS vs the World.
navigation bar remains fixed at the top of each of these pages making it easy to get back to the main section page, or switch to one of the other three locations. If you hover over the Cadillac logo, the global navigation appears and allows you to get to any part of the website.
We’re here to explore though, and there’s an immediate cue for how to go about it. An animation of a series of arrows pointing down suggest that’s where we look. They direct your eye to another downward pointing shape with the words “watch the video”. Shape and words are a link.
Cadillac ATS China.
Clicking scrolls a video from below into place. Below the video is another now familiar downward pointing shape with the words “ATS vs The Wind”. Clicking once again scrolls content from below, this time complete with a change of background image and parallax effect.
Each subsequent click scrolls to a new part of the page. You can navigate the entire page by clicking one shape after another until you reach the end, where you can check in (share on FaceBook, Twitter, or Google+) or visit one of the other three locations.
You could, of course, scroll through the entire page instead of clicking at each stop — you’ll experience the parallax effect a little more, but otherwise navigating the page will be the same until you want to move back up the page (as there are no upward pointing shapes to click).
There are two additional ways to navigate, both located along the right edge of the page. At the very edge is a scroll bar, though not the default one that comes with the browser. It works exactly as you would expect and provides an immediate cue that there’s more on the page than on the screen.
Just inside this scrollbar is a long thin column with a series of lighter and darker dots. Clicking on any dot will take you to a specific section within the page. The dots also offer additional clues about the page.
Lighter dots mark the start of a section. Darker dots take you to a location within each section. Each section is further reinforced by a line separator.
Clicking any dot scrolls the page to the given section or sub-section. Hovering brings up a tool tip pointing to the light dot and containing the heading for each section.
Hovering on the Timeline of Cadillac ATS China.
As with the websites above, everything here works well — the content is limited, and it won’t take long to work out the organization. You’re also encouraged to explore each location in each section, and cues are provided to help in your exploration.
  • The downward pointing shapes invite you to click and get started.
  • Content scrolling into place after a click suggests you can scroll the page on your own.
  • The scroll bar along the right edge further suggests scrolling and provides another mechanism to do so
  • The chapter/timeline feature might be the last thing you discover, but it’s ultimately the quickest way to navigate the page.
Each location is a new destination to explore — both literally (as a new page) and figuratively (with the content each contains). It’s part of the fun, and puts you in discovery mode from the start.
Aside: The main Cadillac website has more conventional navigation (a horizontal navigation bar with drop-downs), though it’s very nicely done and worth a look. The drop-downs present quite a bit of useful information.
The lesson here is that you can provide several ways to navigate for different types of visitors. You should provide immediate cues for how to begin navigation and let more advanced users discover other means to navigate as they explore.
Bleep Radio.

Bleep Radio

Bleep Radio also encourages you to explore their single-page website. Unlike the websites above, there’s less of a directional nature to the scrolling. What you want to do could be located on any part of the page. As with the Cadillac ATS pages, there are visual cues in the form of triangles that suggest they are clickable for navigation.
Any browser open to at least 1200×900 will see most of the main menu, which is inside a large triangle showing the word Discover (again, encouraging exploration). The program link takes you to a section above the page (like Who We Are on Ballantyne). Again, there is an X to get back.
Aside from the Program link, most of the other links are located in the main Discover triangle. And of course, you can scroll up and down the page to find different content.
Bottom of Bleep Radio Website.
While the layout is certainly original and interesting, I don’t think the navigation here works as well as with the other websites, for a few reasons:
  • Unless you navigate to a section toward the top or bottom of the page, you’re left without navigation back besides scrolling. The discover triangle is only present at the top and bottom.
  • Some triangles are clickable, while others aren’t, creating a bit of confusion as to what is and isn’t navigation.
  • The page is always wider than the browser, no matter what size it’s opened to. Scrolling vertically will at times shift things to the right or left.
In all fairness to the website, it’s written in Greek (and I don’t speak Greek) so I could easily be missing some obvious cues.
On a more positive note, the website does have some qualities that are both nice and fun:
  • Clicking the Just Bleep triangle at the top clears away most of the content on the page so that you can focus on the task at hand. Nothing specifically happens for me after clicking Just Bleep (though I’m guessing it would, were I logged into the website).
  • The bleeper section is a grid of member images. There are a few triangles sitting atop the images, and hovering over them results in their shifting to the right or left. There’s no functional purpose, but it lends an interactive feel to the website.
One other thing to point out is the triangle along the right edge that remains fixed in place when scrolling. Clicking on it opens the current on-air Bleep, along with some social buttons. I can’t help but think navigating the website would be easier if the Discover menu was similarly fixed in place along the left edge.
The lesson here is that a unique and creative design can encourage exploration, however you should be consistent in your navigational cues. If a shape, color or specific style is a link in one place, it should be a link everywhere it occurs, or it risks confusing your visitors.

EVO Energy: The Interactive U.K. Energy Consumption Guide

The Interactive U.K. Energy Consumption Guide from EVO Energy is what information graphics on the Web should be. As with the Cadillac website, we’re looking at a single page within a larger website. And as with all the pages, the primary way to navigate is to scroll from top to bottom.
However, scrolling isn’t the only way to navigate the content here. You are expected to interact with the page in order to get most of the information it contains.
UK Energy Consumption Guide - Primary Energy Consumption in 2010.
For example, the first interactive section on the page offers data about the total primary energy consumption from fuel used in the United Kingdom. The main graphic is a tree with circles of various colors representing leaves. Each color is associated with a different type of fuel…
  • Electricity
  • Biomass
  • Gas
  • Petroleum
  • Solid Fuel
The more colored circles are shown in the graphic, the greater that fuel contributes to the total. Each of the fuel types are listed in another graphic to the right, and hovering over them reveals the actual percentage of the fuel within the total.
To the left is another list allowing you to view the same data over different decades. With a couple of hovers and clicks, you will see that solid fuel accounted for 47% of the total in 1970 and only 15% of the total in 2010.
UK Energy Consumption Guide Primary Energy Consumption in 1970.
There’s little in the way of text on the page outside of a few basic bits of information and occasional instructions. It’s hardly needed (though it could enhance the graphics some).
These interactive infographics take advantage of what the Web can do and through interaction the information sinks in a lot more. You aren’t just being presented information — you’re actively selecting the information you want to see, making it more likely that you’ll pay attention and remember it.
The only issue I have with the page is that some panels aren’t interactive. After interacting with so many, I felt cheated when all of a sudden I couldn’t interact with one.
The lesson here is that navigation is more than moving about a website or Web page, it can also be a way to bring content to you in place. Instead of something that takes your visitors from one location on a page or website to another, navigation can be about replacing content in place — it’s a much more engaging way to interact with a website.
UK Energy Consumption Guide Final Energy Consumption Transport.

SEO advice for one page WordPress websites


Use these techniques to make your one page WordPress website search engine friendly.

Optimise the website for a single keyword/phrase plus one secondary keyword

When creating a one page website, it can be tempting to cram in as many different keywords as possible. Don’t!

If you’ve decided on a one page website then you’ve presumably decided to keep things simple. Rather than stuff your website full with detailed descriptions of all your products and services, you want to provide a brief overview about each area of your business.

Boost your SEO with blog posts

Many one page WordPress themes, including SCRN and QuickStep, allow you to create separate blog posts that are linked to from the homepage. This stops the page from becoming excessively long.
Having separate blog posts is a great opportunity for separate keywords.
Each time you write a blog post, optimise it for 1 or 2 keywords. Include these as often as possible (without looking spammy) in the post url, title, headings, body text, etc. Use the fantastic WordPress SEO plugin to create custom post titles and meta descriptions based around these keywords.
Write additional blog posts optimised for the 1 or 2 keywords used on the homepage. This will reinforce the importance of these main keywords.

Consider the use of additional pages

I realise this wouldn’t strictly make it a one page WordPress website! However, lots of one page WordPress themes actually allow you to create additional pages if you choose to do so. This involves adding all your main content to the main homepage, and creating additional pages and linking to them either via the navigation menu or via links on the homepage.
Anyway…… If your WordPress theme allows you to create additional pages then these can be optimised for other keywords in the same way as I described for blog posts, above.

Internal links on one page WordPress websites

Internal links – i.e. keyworded links pointing to other areas within your website – are important for SEO. They’re not one of the first things you think of with one page websites. However, some careful planning will allow you to have an internal linking strategy for a one page WordPress website:

Create anchor links allowing users to jump up and down to relevant content within your main page.

Link between your main page and blog posts (plus any additional pages), and between your blog posts.


  • Choose appropriate navigation based on the needs of the content.
  • Provide alternate forms of navigation when it benefits your visitor.
  • Provide immediate and obvious cues about how to navigate.
  • Offer advanced ways to navigate for advanced users.
  • Encourage exploration, but don’t require it for navigation to be usable.
  • You don’t always have to take people to the content — you can bring the content to them.
Hopefully this brief look at the websites above will get you to explore further and help you generate ideas for alternate ways to navigate content.

More Examples


1. Minimal Content

When designing a single-page website, limiting the amount of content is important. First of all, rememeber that all your content needs to load at one time (unless you’re using Ajax, but even then there’s sometimes a fair amount of content to load at once). Also, if you want to use transitions between your content areas, they often work better when there isn’t a huge amount of content to cover between sections that aren’t bordering each other.
Five or six separate content areas seem to be about the norm on many single-page sites. Some sites limit it to only two or three, even. It’s rare to see a site with more than ten different content areas on a single page.

Examples

A single-page portfolio site that showcases a dozen movie websites. Minimal information is provided in the header, including a contact link.
Colourpixel has a lot of varying information on their site, but for the most part everything is kept short and to the point. There’s contact information, a portfolio and about information, all on a single page.
Ben Lind’s website includes only the minimum amount of content to get his message across.
Single-page sites are perfect for things like events (a wedding in this case). There’s not too much content to include and the single page makes it easy to find whatever you’re looking for.
Stoodeo’s site only contain’s a single page worth of content. By placing the contact form to the side, they’ve really minimized the length of the page.

2. Consider Horizontal Scrolling

Not all horizontally-scrolling websites are single page sites. But a fair number of them are, and it’s an interesting way to break out of the standard single-page box.
Horizontal scrolling can also work better if you have more content. Combining a horizontal layout with JavaScript can also facilitate larger amounts of content without overwhelming the visitor.

Examples

This site incorporates both horizontal and vertical scrolling to get six pages worth of information on a single page.
F Claire Baxter’s site is a fantastic example of using JavaScript to create a site that smoothly scrolls horizontally.
Charlie Gentle’s website uses a horizontal-scrolling slideshow effect to display content.
A huge horizontally-scrolling single page site. They include the contact form right at the beginning, setting it apart from a lot of other horizontal sites that include it on the last screen.
Peter Pearson’s site uses a mix of animation and horizontal scrolling on his site. Multiple pages worth of content are broken up across multiple horizontal screens.

3. Consider Screen Size

With a single-page site, you may want to consider the visible area your visitors likely see within their browser. Crafting your pages to fit comfortably within that space can minimize scrolling while viewing individual sections. This can be particularly important if the transitions between areas are important to you. Once a visitor starts scrolling, they may just keep scrolling rather than using your navigation links.

Examples

This is a very simple, three-screen single page site. Each section of the site easily fits within a single screen and requires no scrolling. The use of bi-directional scrolling to navigate is also a unique touch.
The CreativePeople website uses accordian sliders that come up from the bottom of the screen to display content. No scrolling is required.
Each content area on the Dafvy.co.uk site fits easily within a single screen with no scrolling required. The background color transitions that occur when you click to navigate to each individual section is a very nice touch.
Fuel Brand uses a single-page that fits within your browser window and uses Ajax to show more content.
A simple site with a slideshow and minimal information. The content adjusts to your screen size.

4. Clearly Set Apart Each Section

Most visitors to your site are going to be used to loading a new page for new content. If you squish all the content on your single-page site too close together, they may not see the transitions from one section the next.
There are a variety of ways to differentiate between sections. Using a header for each content area is one way. Some sites use an actual line to separate different areas. And still other sites use ample amounts of white space to set areas apart from one another.

Examples

KINO uses consistent hand-drawn headers for each section of the site, along with a thin, hand-drawn border separating each one.
Simple banners between each section keep a consistent look throughout the page while setting apart each content area.
CreativeSwitch uses images similar to distinct headers for each section of the site, clearly marking transitions between different types of content.
Even something as simple as a thick black bar can be enough to set your content areas apart from each other, as is done here.
The Tomatic website uses a retro rocket and space exploration theme. The header includes a rocket with planets. Various other sections on the site continue the retro theme, and then the footer includes a robot and UFO on a planet’s surface. Each section is set off with a unified header.

5. Take Advantage of a Bigger Background

Big backgrounds are popular in all kinds of website design, but single page designs open up new possibilities for large backgrounds. Many designers take advantage of large background images as a way to set apart their content areas while maintaining a unified look to the entire site.
For example, some sites might have a scene in the background that starts with a sky at the top with one content area, then further down they have a ground-level scene with another content area, and at the bottom they have an underwater scene with yet another content area. The possibilities with this kind of site are almost endless.

Examples

This coming soon page is another great example of using a unified theme throughout the site.
The Volll site uses a seascape/landscape image for the background, with the main content at sea level. Additional information shows up above the main content in the sky and below in the water, right down to the ocean floor.
Jamie Wright’s site uses a more abstract, colorful theme throughout. It really sets the site apart and draws your attention exactly where it should be.
Luke Larsen’s site uses a background that resembles a goldfish bowl.
This is one of the most innovative background designs I’ve seen. As you scroll down the page, colored bars in the background interact with other background elements to produce a one-of-a-kind effect that’s hard to even explain (so go check it out!).

6. Use JavaScript and Ajax to Organize and Display Content

If you have a bit more content to display but still want to stick to a single page design, consider using JS and Ajax to hide some content while others is displayed.
Slideshows are the most popular techniques for incorporating JS, but modal windows and other methods are also used.

Examples

SOFA uses JavaScript to display content on the home page as needed. It results in a very clean, polished design that still presents the necessary information without requiring visitors to leave the main page.
The Giant Creative site uses a JavaScript slideshow to display content while keeping the visitor on a single page.
Deluge Studios uses a variety of slideshows, modal windows, and other JavaScript techniques to include more information on their website than is immediately apparent.
The TapTapTap website uses JavaScript to load information about each of their products without loading a new page.
Jon Brousseau’s site uses JS for subtle enhancements like modal windows and tooltips.

More Examples

Below are a bunch of other great single-page website designs.
Dale Harris
Justin Tsang
Blazing Emblem, LLC
Fish Marketing
Jared Design
Angel Des Lacs
Koffie Verkeerd
Project 365
Kevin Lucius
The Rissington Podcast
Bullet PR
Skywalker Graphics
thinkdj
Jan-Eike Koormann
Janic Design
Adam Woodhouse
Paolo Manganiello
Los Colores Olvidados
Hot Meteor
IndoFolio

In Review…

One-page websites can be a fun and different way to design a site, whether it’s your own personal site or for a client. Consider ways to differentiate your one-page site that might not work as well on a multi-page site. Things like big background images or certain Ajax techniques work really well on one-page sites and have a bigger impact than they do on more complex sites.
Here’s a quick run-down of the best-practices mentioned above:
  1. Minimal content. There’s only room for so much content on a single page.
  2. Consider horizontal scrolling. While not all horizontal-scrolling websites are single pages, it’s a format that lends itself well to the one-page format.
  3. Consider screen size. Creating content areas that fit within a visitor’s screen without requiring scrolling is common in single-page sites.
  4. Clearly set apart each section. You don’t have the convention of separate pages for different content, so you need to figure out another way to delineate content areas.
  5. Take advantage of bigger backgrounds. Single page sites are often longer or larger than other pages, giving more opportunities for creative use of big backgrounds.
  6. Use JavaScript and Ajax. Organizing a lot of content on a single page can be enhanced if you use Ajax or JS techniques like modal windows, tooltips and sliders.

Showcases


Resources: