Showing posts with label Crawlers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Crawlers. Show all posts

Thursday, 27 March 2014

How to make the internet a better place with SEO? by Matt cutts

Does Google Consider SEO to be spam?
A 3 years old video by Mat Cutts that answers a question people still ask.

And the answer is yet the same and will still be the same:

SEO, Stands for Search Engine Optimization, is about trying to make sure that your pages are well represented to search engines. 

How?
  • By making sure the site crawlable (Robots, sitemaps, etc.)
  • Finding the Right keywords (KW and competitors research)
  • Usability and design (titles, headers, landing pages, content, multimedia)
  • Speed 
  • Responsiveness (is it mobile and tablet friendly or not)
  • Update rate (How frequent the site adds new content, and how valuable and informative it is)? 





Wednesday, 12 February 2014

How to find a Broken Backlink? The 404 Analysis Method

You may ask a client, supplier, blogger or whatever to add a link to one of your pages to get some link juice or referrals, but they may do a typo and add a wrong link URL to your site that when clicked it ends visitors up on a 404 not found page. So, how can you know those bad links?!


Here are some ideas to track those links and report them:

1- In the header template of your 404 page, find this line in your Google Analytics Tracking Code: _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']); Then change it as follows: _gaq.push(['_trackPageview','/404error/?url=' + document.location.pathname + document.location.search + '&ref=' + document.referrer]); What's happening here is we're creating a virtual pageview that starts with /404error/ (you can name it anything you want) and then appending 2 made-up parameters to help us spot the source of the problem:
  • · "url=" will catch the URL which a visitor attempted to access. 
  • · "ref=" will catch the referring page. 
Here's what it will look like in your reports (when you do a search for "404error")



2- Another way is use Raven's GA Config tool. Simply add your GA account number then copy the Google Analytics tracking script just before the </head> tag on your 404 page (not your entire website). 
The code will be like this:

Asynchronous

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
 _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview', '/404.html?page=' + document.location.pathname + document.location.search + '&from=' + document.referrer]);

  (function() {
    var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
    ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
    var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

Traditional ga.js

<script type="text/javascript">
var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? " https://ssl." : "http://www.");
document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + " google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E"));
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
try{
var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-XXXXX-X");
pageTracker._trackPageview("/404.html?page=" + document.location.pathname + document.location.search + "&from=" + document.referrer);
} catch(err) {}
</script>

3- More ways:
http://ralphvanderpauw.com/digital-analytics/google-analytics-best-to-track-404-error-pages/ 


Tuesday, 11 February 2014

Use rel="alternate" hreflang="x" annotations to Serve the Correct Language or Regional URL to Searchers!

The rel='alternate' attribute enables you to tell search engines that a web page is available in different language versions. For example, you could add the following to the head section of a web page if that page is available in English, German and French:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://en.example.com” hreflang=”en” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://de.example.com” hreflang=”de” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://.fr.example.com” hreflang=”fr” />

All other languages can be directed to the default version of your website:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://example.com” hreflang=”x-default” />

Some example scenarios where rel="alternate" hreflang="x" is recommended:
  • You keep the main content in a single language and translate only the template, such as the navigation and footer. Pages that feature user-generated content like a forums typically do this.
  • Your content has small regional variations with similar content in a single language. For example, you might have English-language content targeted to the US, GB, and Ireland.
  • Your site content is fully translated. For example, you have both German and English versions of each page.

Using language annotations

Imagine you have an English language page hosted at http://www.example.com/, with a Spanish alternative at http://es.example.com/. You can indicate to Google that the Spanish URL is the Spanish-language equivalent of the English page in one of three ways:
  • HTML link element in header. In the HTML <head> section of http://www.example.com/, add a link element pointing to the Spanish version of that webpage at http://es.example.com/, like this:
    <link rel="alternate" hreflang="es" href="http://es.example.com/" />
  • HTTP header. If you publish non-HTML files (like PDFs), you can use anHTTP header to indicate a different language version of a URL:
    Link: <http://es.example.com/>; rel="alternate"; hreflang="es"
  • Sitemap. Instead of using markup, you can submit language version information in a Sitemap.
If you have multiple language versions of a URL, each language page must identify all language versions, including itself.  For example, if your site provides content in French, English, and Spanish, the Spanish version must include a rel="alternate" hreflang="x" link for itself in addition to links to the French and English versions. Similarly, the English and French versions must each include the same references to the French, English, and Spanish versions.
You can specify multi-language URLs in the same domain as a given URL, or use URLs from a different domain.
It's a good idea to provide a generic URL for geographically unspecified users if you have several alternate URLs targeted at users with the same language, but in different locales. For example, you may have specific URLs for English speakers in Ireland (en-ie), Canada (en-ca), and Australia (en-au), but want all other English speakers to see your generic English (en) page, and everyone else to see the homepage. In this case you should specify the generic English-language (en) page for searchers in, say, the UK. You can annotate this cluster of pages using a Sitemap file or using HTML link tags like this:
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-ie" hreflang="en-ie" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-ca" hreflang="en-ca" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-au" hreflang="en-au" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en" hreflang="en" />
For language/country selectors or auto-redirecting homepages, you should add an annotation for the hreflang value "x-default" as well:
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/" hreflang="x-default" />

Supported language values

The value of the hreflang attribute identifies the language (in ISO 639-1 format) and optionally the region (in ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 format) of an alternate URL. For example:
  • de: German content, independent of region
  • en-GB: English content, for GB users
  • de-ES: German content, for users in Spain
Do not specify a country code by itself! Google does not automatically derive the language from the country code. You can specify a language code by itself if you want to simplify your tagging.  Adding the country code after the language to restrict the page to a specific region.  Examples:
  • be: Belarusian language, independent of region (not Belgium French)
  • nl-be: Dutch for Belgium
  • fr-be: French for Belgium 
For language script variations, the proper script is derived from the country. For example, when using zh-TW for users zh-TW, the language script is automatically derived (in this example: Chinese-Traditional). You can also specify the script itself explicitly using ISO 15924, like this:
  • zh-Hant: Chinese (Traditional)
  • zh-Hans: Chinese (Simplified)
Alternatively, you can also specify a combination of script and region—for example, usezh-Hans-TW to specify Chinese (Simplified) for Taiwanese users.
Finally, the reserved value "x-default" is used for indicating language selectors/redirectors which are not specific to one language or region, e.g. your homepage showing a clickable map of the world.

Common Mistakes

Important: Make sure that your provided hreflang value is actually valid. Take special care in regard to the two most common mistakes:
In general you are advised to sign up with your site to Webmaster Tools. This enables you to receive messages in regard to wrong annotations.
Example Widgets, Inc has a website that serves users in the USA, Great Britain, and Germany. The following URLs contain substantially the same content, but with regional variations:
  • http://www.example.com/ Default page that doesn't target any language or locale; may have selectors to let users pick their language and region.
  • http://en.example.com/page.html English-language homepage. Contains information about fees for shipping internationally from the USA.
  • http://en-gb.example.com/page.html English-language; displays prices in pounds sterling.
  • http://en-us.example.com/page.html English-language; displays prices in US dollars.
  • http://de.example.com/seite.html German-language version of the content
rel="alternate" hreflang="x" is used as a page level, not a site level, and you need to mark up each set of pages, including the home page, as appropriate. You can specify as many content variations and language/regional clusters as you need.
To indicate to Google that you want the German version of the page to be served to searchers using Google in German, the en-us version to searchers using google.com in English, and the en-gb version to searchers using google.co.uk in English, userel="alternate" hreflang="x" to identify alternate language versions.
Update the HTML of each URL in the set by adding a set of rel="alternate" hreflang="x" link elements. For the default page that doesn’t target any specific language or locale, add rel="alternate" hreflang="x-default":
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="x-default" href="http://www.example.com/" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-gb" href="http://en-gb.example.com/page.html" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-us" href="http://en-us.example.com/page.html" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en" href="http://en.example.com/page.html" />
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="de" href="http://de.example.com/seite.html" />
This markup tells Google's algorithm to consider all of these pages as alternate versions of each other.

Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Search Engines Ranking Factors - Survey and Correlation Data by MOZ

Every two years, Moz surveys the opinions of dozens of the world's brightest search marketers and runs correlation studies to better understand the workings of search engine algorithms. They gather this data to gain insight into the factors that may help—or hurt—a website's visibility in search engines. Note that these factors are not "proof" of what search engines use to rank websites, but simply show the characteristics of web pages that tend to rank higher.


Friday, 24 January 2014

SEO during site downtime or Maintenance

If you take down your website temporarily, you must inform search engines such as Google. As you could read above, this is done by utilizing the HTTP status code: 503 Service Unavailable, that informs the search engines that the server is temporarily unavailable. To do this one must first create a file that returns a 503 status code on the server. When the search engine sees this, it will understand the situation. This can be done by copying the four lines below into Notepad (or the like) and saving it as 503.php. You must then place this file in the root of your server.

The first two lines tell us that it is a 503 status code, and the last line is used to tell when the website is expected to be online again. Google understands this message, so it is possible to tell Google when to visit the website again. You must either provide a number (seconds) or a date. If you live in Denmark like I do and you expect to return on the 5th of January 2012, at 14:00, you must put down:



Notice that I wrote 13:00:00 in the code, even though I wrote 14:00:00 above. This is due to the fact that the time must be provided in GMT/UTC, which is, in my case, 1 hour behind local time.

But it is not enough to just put a 503 message on your server. You will receive visitors (Google included) from many different sources and to all sorts of pages of your website. They must all be redirected to the message explaining that the website is temporarily closed.

On an Apache/Linux server, this can be easily solved by using a .htaccess file to redirect all the pages towards the 503.php file. The .htaccess file is often used for 301 redirects, but that is not our purpose here. We will use a 302 redirect. You may have been previously warned about using this sort of redirect, and for good reason. It can do a great deal of damage if not used correctly. But in this case, it must be used, and in fact a 301 redirect would be detrimental in its place.

Save the 6 following lines as a .htaccess file and place it in the root of your server as well.
The 'R' in the last line indicates that this is a 302 redirect. R is 302 by default. To create a 301 redirect, it would have said [R=301, L]. The clever thing about this file, however, is that we can give ourselves access to the site and simultaneously show everyone else a 503 message. Let’s say you have the following IP address: 12.345.678.910. You then put the numbers in line 4 as shown below:

When you have placed the two files (503.php and .htaccess) on your server, you’re done. You now have peace and quiet to tinker with your website, as long as you leave those two files in the root of your server – and if Google visits, they’ll know that the site will be back later, and you’ve even let them know when to try again.

But what about passing on the message to your visitors?

How to tell your visitors that the website is only closed temporarily.

With a few additions to the 503.php file, which we made just before, we can pass on a message to visitors:
Source: http://moz.com/blog/how-to-handle-downtime-during-site-maintenance 

Tuesday, 21 January 2014

Google Algorithms Pets in a nutshell

Are you still getting confused between the 3 algorithms of Google; Panda, Penguin, and the Hummingbird?
which is which and which does what?
here is a simple diagram showing you the function and basic information on each:


Source: http://www.link-assistant.com/news/key-google-updates.html 


Thursday, 9 January 2014

How to Get Notified by SMS or Email if my Website is Down?

In 4 simple steps, you can Get Notified by SMS or Email if your Website is Down, and for free! 


  1. Sign-in to your Google account and then click here to copy this Google sheet into your Google Drive. You may use your Google Apps account as well.
  2. Put your website URLs in cell B2 (comma separated) and your email address in cell B3. If you wish to be alerted by text messages, just replace No with Yes in cell B4.
  3. You’ll find a new Website Monitor menu in your Google Docs toolbar. Click Initialize and you’ll get a pop-up asking for authorization. Grant the necessary access.
  4. Go to the Website Monitor menu again and choose “Start” to begin the monitoring process. Close the Google Sheet.



Tuesday, 17 December 2013

How to Give Access to Search Engines to a Restricted Content with FCF?

If you offer subscription-based access to your website content, or if users must register to access your content, then search engines cannot access some of your site's most relevant, valuable content.
Implementing Google's First Click Free (FCF) for your content allows you to include your restricted content in Google's main search index. Our intention is to protect your content while allowing for its inclusion in Google's search index. First Click Free has two main goals:
  • To include high-quality content in Google's search index, providing a better experience for Google users who may not have known that content existed.
  • To provide a promotion and discovery opportunity for webmasters of sites with restricted content.
To implement First Click Free, you need to allow all users who find a document on your site via Google search to see the full text of that document, even if they have not registered or subscribed to see that content. The user's first click to your content area is free. However, once that user clicks a link on the original page, you can require them to sign in or register to read further. The user must be able to see the full content of a multi-page article. You can allow this by displaying all content on a single page to both Googlebot and users. Alternatively, you can use cookies to make sure that a user can visit each page of a multi-page article before being asked for registration or payment.
In order to successfully crawl your site, Google needs to be able to crawl your content without filling out a registration form. The easiest way to do this is to configure your webservers not to serve the registration page to google crawlers (when the user-agent is "Googlebot") so that Googlebot can crawl these pages successfully. You can choose to allow Googlebot access to some restricted pages but not others. 

Tuesday, 10 December 2013

Store Locator and Local SEO Plugin for Wordpress

Yoast has just released a major update to its Local SEO plugin. This new version has some new functionality; most important is the new store locator option. 

This option is especially handy if your company has multiple locations or your brand is sold in many different stores. 

The store locator will allow customers to easily find the nearest location of your company. 

Customers can fill in their home address and a list of the nearest locations of your company will appear! 

Check out the new functionality and buy the Local SEO plugin!

This Local SEO plugin largely improves the usability of the contact page of your website. It allows you to:
SEOlocal_icoon_mapsInsert Google Maps - This extra functionality will make it easier for your customers to  (physically) navigate to the location of your company.
SEOlocal_icoon_adressInsert address(es) of your company - Our Local SEO plugin makes it easy to show your company address(es) in a clear and uniform format, while adding all the necessary technical markup for search engines.
SEOlocal_icoon_openinghoursInsert opening hours of your company - Our Local SEO plugin makes it easy to show your opening hours in a clear and uniform format.
SEOlocal_icoon_storelocatorInsert a store locator - The store locator will allow customers to easily find the nearest location of your company. Customers can fill in their home address and a list of the nearest locations of your company will appear.


Wednesday, 4 December 2013

Using the “The Skyscraper Technique” for SEO and Content Creation

This SEO technique is called 'he Skyscraper Method' because it shares the same logic of Skyscrapers; People always prefer the best of the best. and the highest of the high.

There are 3 basic steps to The Skyscraper Technique To Get Quality Links and Targeted Traffic:

Step 1: Find link-worthy content


Either by getting the top articles on Google SERP for your keyword, or by searching for the most shared pages of your competitors or Benchmarks (you can use MOZ's OpenSiteExplorer to get the pages with most backlinks for specific sites you believe have Skyscraper content.

Step 2: Make something even better


By converting keywords in your titles like (How to, Top, lists, Best, Free, Great, Why, Tips, etc.) and implementing SEO wisely, like using the KWs in the title tag, Header, and URL. also making your page mobile and social media friendly, using multimedia (images, and videos), or creating infographics. And of course making the page fast and clean.

Step 3: Reach out to the right people


There are many ways you can reach the right people for this sculptuerd piece of content. Just be creative. You can simply share this content manually with the websites you mentioned within your blog post, or searching for similar content on blogs, forums, or social media pages, and share it.



Wednesday, 11 September 2013

Bounces to Leads Converter - The Ice Breaker of E-Commerce

I got a crazy idea that I believe will rock the SEO world.

let's agree first that SEO (and PPC) are not about traffic anymore but about Revenue and Sales.

Even if you are not selling any product, you need the traffic to sell ads of third parties.

OK then..

Do you know that the only challenge in SEO (and PPC) campaigns is not to drive traffic but to keep them? and what is really more challenging is to convert them to Leads to buy what you are offering.

70-96% of visitors abandoning your site will never return  

Here are even more facts:


  • 90%-99% Of Your Marketing Spend Is Completely Worthless
  • Email is a phenomenal profit driver, however most websites capture less than 1 in 400 emails from visitors (who have not purchased)
  • Up to 85% of shoppers who add to cart DO NOT BUY ANYTHING



Imagine:

Mrs. Lynda owns a store in a Big Mall and Mr. Christopher happened to pass by her nice store when he was doing his weekly shopping. He stayed for a couple of minutes, went through her products, felt interested in some of them, checked the prices, thought of dropping her store another visit when he is prepared to buy, then he left. 

30 minutes later, he entered another store selling the same products like you do, but the store looked better with more promotions and friendly staff. A cute saleswoman broke the ice and approached him. She asked him about what he is looking for, they talked for a while, she showed him some products, he was convinced and bought what he needed. 

And never came back to poor Mrs. Lynda who is selling the same thing. 

The Lesson here is: Sales NEED Ice-Breakers 


So,
The tool I created is not an invention per se albeit it does not exist yet. 
It is a combination of 3 already existing tools, but in one All-In-One Powerful onsite SEO tool
That I will call The Bounces2Leads Tool (AKA, The Ice Breaker of E-commerce) 

What it does:

It simply detects when a visitor abandons the website, then after they do, a window appears asking the visitor to chat with a representative if they have any inquiries before they leave.  
So, it is using the Bounce Exchange service but instead of popping up a banner, it will pop up a chatting window with a real person representative. 

Here is How Bounce Exchange Works:




As for the chatting services you can find hundreds of software online to choose from (I prefer those that can forward chats to Google Hangouts and can go mobile)

Finally, you can have an email marketing software to manage your newsletter in case your visitor preferred to leave their email address instead of chatting with a rep. 

But why have 3 services with a cost more than 3000$ if you can have only one that does it all for a fraction of that price (I did not price it yet but it will be way cheaper)



Wednesday, 4 September 2013

More than 50 Reasons Why SEOProfiler is a MUST Have Tool for SEO

I am sure you have heard of SEOProfiler  before. I believe everybody is talking about it now.
But why do SEO Specialists think it is a strong competitor to Raven Tools, Moz, Web CEO, and Webmeup?

Here are 50+ reasons: 
seo profiler for 1$ only


  1. Keywords Ranking monitor             
  2. Check rankings on Google, Yahoo & Bing
  3. Number of keywords in ranking monitor
  4. Search depth
  5. Alerts
  6. Opportunities
  7. Get actionable items
  8. Website audit  
  9. Weekly audit
  10. Number of links and pages
  11. Web page optimization               
  12. On page optimization
  13. Neighborhood checker
  14. Readability checker
  15. Link building tools          
  16. Backlink analyzer
  17. Get backlinks by category, etc.
  18. Hub finder
  19. Backlink manager
  20. Link manager links
  21. Backlink optimizer
  22. Link opportunity finder
  23. Starter backlinks
  24. Automatic backlink check
  25. Contact information finder
  26. Competitive intelligence            
  27. Competitor backlink spy
  28. Competitor Google AdWords spy
  29. Competitor Google ranking spy
  30. Social media checker    
  31. Check social media mentions
  32. Check likes and clicks
  33. Analyze Twitter followers
  34. Website submission     
  35. Automatic search engine submission
  36. Submission to article directories, etc.
  37. Website analytics           
  38. Integrates with Google AdWords
  39. Submission to article directories, etc.
  40. Keyword research         
  41. Keyword suggestion tool
  42. Keyword difficulty tool
  43. Competitor keyword spy tool
  44. AdWords keyword optimization tools
  45. CSV reports      
  46. Create PDF reports
  47. White label reports
  48. Custom Dashboard
  49. Integrate with Google Analytics
  50. Different plans with prices starting from 49$ up to 999$ a month
  51. Ability to use all the features with only 1 dollar for a whole month
Why do not you Give it a Try NOW

Thursday, 29 August 2013

Top Resources to Learn and Master SEO

Zach Bulygo created a list of 58 resources to help any one becoming an seo expert. I would love to share the list with you as it is truly handy not only for seo newbies but also for seniors as well.

But since it is 58, a strange number in fact, I will added 2 more resources to make it a complete SIXTY :) Is not Sharing Amazing?

Ok Here we are:

SEO 101

1. How Google Crawls – Discusses the basics of how Google crawls the web, indexes, and serves results.
2. How Google Works – If you want to get into SEO, you’ll need to understand the basics of how Google (and other) search engines work. This video provides a background on Google search.
3. Getting the Basics – If you want to get traffic from Google and rank well, you’ll need to have a site that Google views as high quality. It has certain signals that it uses to gauge a site’s quality. This article covers the basics of what attributes you’ll need.
4. PageRank – To understand the Google search engine and why some sites rank higher than others, you’ll need to have an understanding of PageRank. This Wikipedia article gives a good background. (It’s even referenced by Google employees.)
5. Quick Sprout’s Guide to SEO – A 9 chapter, infographic-style guide to SEO. A good resource if you don’t want to read a book but want something more thorough than a simple explanation.
6. Moz’s Guide to SEO – Don’t want to learn about SEO through long infographics? Then check out this 10 chapter guide written by the folks over at Moz.
7. SEO Starter Guide – Written by Google – A 32 page document which explains how to run SEO. This document was written by Google in 2010.
8. 8 First Step SEO Tips for Bloggers – Are you a blogger who wants to increase traffic to your website? Try reading this article first to get a good start on your SEO knowledge.
9. SEO Tips for Beginners – Are you a total novice when it comes to SEO? If so, read this short article which lists 5 things you can do right now to get you pointed in the right direction.

Free Tools

Quality, free tools – what could be better? Check them out:
10. Google Webmaster Tools – Before you look at any other tool, check out this suite of tools provided by Google. For help using Webmaster Tools, check out this page. Also check out Bing Webmaster Tools.
11. Open Site Explorer – Also known as the search engine for links, Open Site Explorer is a Moz creation. This tool allows you to see who links to your site, find links that point to old and broken pages, and research competitors to see who links to them. To check out the toolbar and view the product demo, check out this page. In order to understand this tool, you’ll need to be familiar with the termsPage Authority and Domain Authority. Note: this is a limited free tool. You can pay for enhanced access.
12. Microsoft SEO Toolkit – The Microsoft web team made an SEO tool. Check it out here.
13. Broken Link Finder – Having broken links lowers the quality of your website, which in turn hurts SEO. Find them and squash them with this free tool.
14. SEO Site Tools – An extension for Chrome that pulls up page rank, meta description, incoming links, and more for the site you’re visiting.
15. Keyword Suggestion Tool – A free tool (with an account) from SEO Book. Shows the number of searches for a specific keyword and gives suggestions.
16. Majestic SEO – A good tool for viewing backlinks to your website. Also check out Link Diagnosis.
17. Spider View Simulator – View your website the way a spider would. This will give your site a different perspective and may help you find and fix errors. Also check out their other tools.
18. Spider Test Tool – Similar tool as above, but this one is from SEO Book.
19. Robots.txt Checker – Errors in your robots.txt can cause problems for a spider’s ability to crawl your webpage. Find them with this free tool.
20. WordPress SEO Plugin – A popular plugin for WordPress. View the webpage to see a list of all the features.
21. Anchor Text Over Optimization – Google is cracking down on websites that are overly optimized for SEO. Part of that involves anchor text. This tool highlights where you may be at risk for anchor text over optimization.
22. Test Page Speed – Your website speed affects your page ranking, so you want to ensure your website loads as quickly as possible. This tool (from Google) will measure your site’s speed and offer suggestions for improving speed.
23. Google Trends – Shows volume of searches over time. A good tool to view keyword popularity.

Knowing the Status of Your Website

Want to know how optimized your website is for SEO? Check out these for help:
24. Anatomy of a Perfectly Optimized Web Page – Unsure of how to make an SEO optimized page? Or not sure if your page is optimized? Print out this graphic and hang it in your office.
25. Webmaster Guidelines – Take a while to read these guidelines and make sure your site is in compliance with Google. Don’t forget to check out the Link Schemesdocument, which has recently been updated. For a background on the update,check out this article.
26. Marketing Grader – HubSpot’s popular free tool gives you an overview of your marketing efforts, including an SEO analysis.

Tips and Tricks

By “tricks,” I don’t mean “If you just do x to your site, you’ll soar to the top!” That won’t work. These articles don’t promise anything of that nature. They give quality information for you to know:
27. Setting up an SEO Friendly WordPress Site – WordPress is a publishing platform that is used by millions of websites. Read this article if you have a WordPress site or want to get set up with one and are not too familiar with SEO.
28. SEO for Blogs – Don’t have a WordPress site but still want SEO for blogs? Have a WordPress site and want to learn about SEO for any kind of blog? If yes, check out this article.
29. Patrick McKenzie’s SEO Tricks – McKenzie provides some SEO tricks. Even if you’re advanced with SEO, it won’t hurt to read this.
30. Making Content Memorable – If you run a blog, it’s important to not put your time and energy into getting tweets, likes, +1′s, etc. Why? Because it’s still not totally clear how these play into Google’s ranking. You should be spending your time focusing on producing great content. This SEO Copywriting (SuccessWorks) article gives a good overview of how to turn an article from “meh” to memorable.
31. Strategic SEO for Startups – More good SEO tips from McKenzie, this time focusing on “Startup SEO.”
32. Quick Wins in SEO – Want some quick wins (that you may not be familiar with already) in SEO? Are you familiar with title tags and h2 tags? If not, check out this article. It’ll help bring some quick wins to your website.
33. SEO for Software Companies – Run a software company and want to know how to get traffic to your website via content creation? Check out this article for all the details.
34. SEO Tips from Gabriel Weinberg – Ever heard of the DuckDuckGo search engine? The creator of that search engine, Gabriel Weinberg, gives a few of his SEO tips here.
35. SEO for ecommerce – An 8 part article which delves into optimizing an ecommerce site for SEO.
36. Conducting a Competitive SEO Audit – HubSpot gives an overview of how to conduct an SEO audit of the competitive landscape.
37. What Every Programmer Should Know – Are you a developer that’s a little unsure about SEO? Read this article written by a developer explaining the ins and outs of SEO.
38. Best SEO Tactics Post-Panda – In February 2011, Google released a relatively significant update to its algorithm. The update was known as Panda and it hurt the traffic of a lot of sites. This Quora thread gives good tips for surviving and maintaining strong Google traffic in a post-Panda world.

Staying Updated

As mentioned, staying updated on Google algorithm changes is important. Of course, there are a few principles that are timeless and good policy. For example, maintaining a quality site with accurate information is top priority, because content is king. These things won’t change.
But being aware of any changes or updates to the Google guidelines and complying with what they’re looking for is required, too. These resources will help you do that. They also contain solid advice that you can use for your SEO efforts. Add these blogs to your RSS reader to stay on top of all things SEO:
39. Google Webmaster Central Blog – The official Google blog for all things related to its search. Written for webmasters.
40. Google Algorithm Changelog – A good, unofficial resource where you can find the change history to the Google algorithm.
41. Google Webmaster YouTube Channel – Frequently updated with a Q&A from Matt Cutts. If anything about SEO is a “must watch,” it’s this. No speculation, no conjecture, just accurate information from a key employee on Google’s search team.
42. Moz Blog – A variety of topics in the SEO arena are covered. Features a variety of guest bloggers.
43. KISSmetrics SEO posts – A collection of SEO articles that have been posted to the KISSmetrics blog.
44. Search Engine Land – This homepage has lots of good articles related to SEO.
45. Dave Naylor – Dave Naylor is well respected in the SEO industry. Read his blog to get the latest insights.
46. HubSpot SEO Posts – A collection of posts HubSpot has relating to SEO.
47. SEO Book Blog – Aaron Wall is well known in the SEO community. This is his blog, which is part of his site.
48. Search Engine Journal – Gives you tips while also providing some industry news and commentary.
49. SEO Roundtable – Provides a good overview on SEO news.
50. YouMoz – Blog posts written by the Moz community.
51. Search Engine Guide – Contains lots of intriguing and educational posts..
52. Alltop SEO – A continuously updated collection of all the top posts from a variety of SEO blogs.

Getting Inside the SEO Industry

Want to engage and communicate with SEO enthusiasts? Check out these resources:
53. Webmaster Central Forum – A large forum hosted by Google where you can get help with SEO issues.
54. Moz Community – A community hosted by Moz that features a Q&A, articles written by others in the community, and webinars.
55. SEO Subreddit – An SEO community in Reddit. Features news, Q&A, case studies, and more.

Get Help

In addition to getting help with the 3 resources mentioned above, you can also try these paid methods:
56. Talk with an Expert – Need to talk to someone for help or advice with SEO? Check out the experts available on Clarity.
57. SEO Book Community – A popular SEO community. It does require a paid account of $300 a month.
58. Inbound – A Hacker News-like discussion board where many inbound marketing issues are covered. There’s a heavy focus on SEO here.

To Make them 60


Good LucK!