Showing posts with label Advanced SEO. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Advanced SEO. Show all posts

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Tracking Google Ranking Change by Sector - A New Tool to follow the Bot

With the SEO landscape constantly changing, it can be difficult for Search marketers to follow Google’s updates and their impact on each site. In 2014, there were numerous updates spread throughout the year, with more Panda updates than you can count on one hand. 

On April 21, 2015 (yesterday), Google’s latest update went live, changing the reward structure for mobile-optimized sites and mobile search results. This is the biggest update of the year, as claimed by Google, and we were anticipating significant fluctuations in the Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs) within each industry, but so far nothing happened. 

How did we know?


Ayima Pulse, a tool that was launched yesterday to provide market insight to help marketers adjust their SEO strategy based on any and all algorithm changes and fluctuations in real-time.





Ayima Pulse tracks over 54,000 hand-picked, non-branded keywords in 10 unique industries across the UK & US – more than any other equivalent free tool on the market. This provides unprecedented insight into when shifts occur in Google’s algorithm by industry, and the sites affected.

Pulse is showing fluctuations from the past 30 days in the following industries:


  • Telecoms
  • Travel
  • Electronics
  • Insurance
  • Fashion
  • Finance
  • Jobs
  • Education
  • Gambling
  • Automotive


an “All keywords” view that combines all the industry reports into a single view of Google’s fluctuations.

Whilst major Panda, Penguin, and mobile updates garner the coverage to alert marketers of changes within the SERPs, day-to-day fluctuations go unpublicised. In turn, attributing a drop in traffic and possibly conversions becomes problematic. Crucially, these unannounced changes may only affect the industry in which YOU operate. Pulse offers a solution to this problem by offering industry focused tracking that’s updated daily.

How Ayima Pulse Works?


At midnight each day, Ayima Pulse takes Google’s top 100 organic search results for the most popular non-branded keywords relevant to the top 10 industries and add them to Ayima Pulse database Site ranking changes are assessed against those from the previous day, proportionately weighting the significance of each move.

Ayima Pulse plots the difference on a sliding volatility scale of 0-100, updating graphs for the whole market and individual industries.

How Can Ayima Pulse Help Marketers?


Very simply, the more ranking fluctuations you see, the higher the volatility rating. Selecting an industry displays the volatility for that sector along with the top 10 highest ranked sites (assessed across relevant keywords).

If you want to see a site’s visibility trend line and percentage share of voice, just select a site from the top 10 or top 100 list. Or if you want to see how you stack up against the competition, you can select up to 5 sites to compare. Plot lines will display the trend against the volatility of that industry.

Sites displaying an increase in visibility on a highly volatile day have been positively affected by changes in the SERPs. Likewise, those displaying reduced visibility would have been adversely affected.

Who are Ayima Pulse's Competitors? 

Before Ayima Pulse, we have been using Algoroo and MOZ Algorthm changes:

What is Algoroo?

Algoroo is a Google algorithm tracking tool developed by DEJAN. The system monitors roughly 17,000 keywords to 100 search positions deep and looks for fluctuations. Both negative and positive movement is added up to create a single SERP flux metric they call "roo". High roo value indicates a high volatility in Google's search results. Low roo value is usually displayed on an ordinary day, unlikely to be affected by any algorithmic changes at Google. Throughout its timeline you may notice a number of detected events which go onto orange or even red. Google doesn't always disclose internal updates and algorithm changes, but when they do Algoroo add it as an annotation on its graph.




MozCast and Google Algorithm Change History By Moz

MozCast is a weather report showing turbulence in the Google algorithm over the previous day (or see the 5-day history on the left). The hotter and stormier the weather, the more Google's rankings changed. Google Algorithm Change history lists all the algorithm changes by date and name (if there is any)



Resources:

  • https://www.ayima.com/pulse/
  • https://algoroo.com/
  • http://mozcast.com/ 
  • http://moz.com/google-algorithm-change

Google is so 2010 - Inspired by Andrew Shotland

Andrew Shotland, the author of Local SEO Guide, once said in an interview with SEOBook, "SEO is not exactly Ghandi-type work. So you better enjoy it."

But that is not his best quotation. To me, his masterpiece, and what really affected me is: 

"Leavng Google is like walking away from a bully. Everything I do now in terms of marketing is pro-active and on my terms. There's no rug under me. There's no dictator telling me how to be righteous. Sure, I stand or fall on my own marketing acumen, which is all I asked for anyway. I never wanted to be punished based on a 3rd party's rules. If I mess up, I want to mess up because my target market (the 2nd party) don't want what I have to offer at the price I'm offering it - not because some 3rd party intermediator decides arbitrarily that I'm not good for my target market."

With thousands of websites going online everyday, SEO agencies are also growing in number, and do not be surprised to find one in every corner. It is not a rocket science and if you are lucky and have good sales team you can make fortune "Selling SEO" to small businesses who believe that they can make fortune too being on top of Google SERP for the keyword "buy" or "fix".

The problem with these companies is that they know very well that SEO is for Google not for the customer, and because they are selling keywords not value, they end up losing both Google and the customer and eventually the deceived business owner who believed that the SEO agency can do her/his site some Apracadabra magic to make it rank.

If only SEO is run by smart marketers who know very well how the market is shaped and understand the true meaning of the word value, only then even Google will become obsolete.
Those Google Hypocrites do not only waste their time doing an old fashion dead job, but they also harm their clients' websites with their spam, scraped nonsense content, and over optimized stuffed with keywords tags.

Why I am saying that now, because after google scared the hell out of everybody regarding its Mobilegeddon algorithm change, nothing happened. But of course I am not blaming Google, I am blaming those who decided to make their sites user friendly just because they fear Google, not because they want their visitors to enjoy their stay on their sites. For those people I would say, you deserve it!

Thursday, 26 February 2015

Track Visits to Unused Domains on Google Analytics

Every now and then I come up with a new idea of a website and brainstorm to find a good brand (domain) name for it that is not already taken. Then I buy it, get busy, and did not have the time after that to do it.

But anyways, what if I want to know how many type-in traffic I am receiving to all these domains?

Of course I could create a Google Analytics account and embed its tracking code and keep an eye on the traffic. However, that does not seem convenient if you do not have much traffic that worth monitoring them in a separate account. Or, if you have hundreds of these parked domains, and it would take forever to create (and keep an eye on) separate Google Accounts.

Creating a Google Analytics account for a parked domain is also impossible if there is no page at all, and the domain is 301 redirected from the DNS to another site.

So, I believe the easiest and fastest way to track all parked domains is to use DNS redirections and UTM tracking.

Here is how to do it: (This method requires that you redirect unused domains to tracked domain(s))

  1. Identify the destination page (It could be a used site that you want to redirect type-in traffic to it, or a sandbox site that you will use as a pool to collect all parked domains traffic stats. 
  2. Go to Google Campaign URL Builder (https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1033867?rd=2
  3. In the ‘website URL’ field put the URL of the destination domain (not the parked domain) 
  4. Fill in the ‘campaign source’, ‘campaign medium’, and ‘campaign name’ fields with whatever labels you prefer. I used ‘redirection’, ‘301’, and ‘forwarded_parked_domains’. 
  5. After you click submit you should see a URL like that: http://www.sandbox.com/?utm_source=redirection&utm_medium=301&utm_campaign=forwarded_parked_domains

Now, copy the generated URL and paste it in your DNS section of Domain forward.

Here is how I did it on Godaddy: https://support.godaddy.com/help/article/422/manually-forwarding-or-masking-your-domain-name

If you use otehr DNS provider, google “Domain forward + your DNS provider’ and you will find the how-to

P.S. Another way is to open your .htaccess file and paste the following 2 lines:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^$ http://www.sandbox.com/?utm_source=redirection&utm_medium=301&utm_campaign=forwarded_parked_domains [R=301,L]


Of course you will use your own campaign URL


To retrieve the stats on Google Analytics:


You can find the results under Acquisition > Campaigns (as illustrated below)








Tuesday, 24 February 2015

20 Reasons Localization Is Essential To Website Conversions

Thanks to the global reach of the internet, website localisation is one of the best things you can do to increase website conversions. By creating a culture- and language-specific version of your website for each demographic market you target, you become a truly international business. All businesses, even small online retailers, can benefit from localization. In fact, you can’t afford not to have localized websites, and here are 20 reasons why.

1. It offers global expansion and increased reach.

Although English is still the predominant language online, other languages, most notably Chinese, Spanish, French, and Arabic, are quickly closing the distance. Offering web content in additional languages and cultures helps you increase your reach and become a respected international business.

2. Localization helps you appeal to multicultural audiences.

Translation helps international visitors find and buy from you, but it doesn’t consider cultural differences and sometimes doesn’t convey your message or brand very well. Localization includes both cultural and linguistic concerns, helping you reach audiences in different cultures much better.

3. It increases web traffic.

Search engines rank websites with localized versions or pages higher than non-localized websites and return your website as a result more often. On top of that, local sites are more likely to link to you when you provide information in the local language. Increasing traffic is one of the three most important things you can do to boost revenue, and more traffic means more sales.

4. You get more traffic from regional and language-specific search engines.

These smaller search engines have much less competition because they’re small and most businesses don’t have localized websites to appear in results. This means it’s much easier for your localized websites to rank higher than your English website. The higher you rank and the more often your website appears in search results, the more traffic and sales you get.

5. Localization increases brand recognition.

When you translate your website into the language and culture of your target market, you show that you respect and value your audience. They in turn are more aware of your business than your English-only competitors because they see your website more often and more easily understand your message.

6. Localization increases website stickiness and sales.

Having a strong localization plan boosts your presence and sales in a targeted area, such as localizing in French and German to increase sales in Europe. Multiple studies have found that when users are presented with a website in their native language, they stay on the site twice as long and are four times more likely to make a purchase from it.

7. It increases overall ROI.

Increased traffic, conversions, and brand awareness also leads to increased trust, credibility, customer loyalty, and satisfaction, in turn leading to more conversions. Localization is also scalable for both your audience and your budget, delivering huge benefits for only a marginal additional cost.

8. Localization maintains low printing and content distribution costs.

Localizing your website increases reach without raising these costs a few ways. First, you can reuse much of the same content across multiple languages; second, translating your website into a new language and culture is scalable; finally, having a web presence costs the same no matter what language or culture. Having a localized website may also eliminate the need for direct mail such as catalogs and brochures in various languages.

9. It is a cost-effective virtual branch office or satellite location.

Instead of building a brick-and-mortar store or renting an office in an international location, your localized websites become those virtual stores by offering information, products, contacts, and everything else you can deliver digitally.




10. Localization lowers customer support costs.

By answering questions and providing information in a target market’s native language and culture, you give customers what they need online in the best format for them, which reduces the need for multilingual phone and chat support.

11. It allows you to target minorities in your own area.

Many countries have large subgroups with their own languages, cultures, and skyrocketing purchasing power, such as the Latino market in the USA. Creating localized websites for these groups helps you solidify your presence and boost sales in your own area.

12. Localization maintains brand image and voice across cultures.

The problem with straight translation is that it doesn’t consider cultural differences and doesn’t always maintain your branding message. Localization is better than translation because it considers communication, sales incentive, design, layout, and programming specific to each culture and area, so you don’t lose the integrity of your brand across languages.

13. You become a local business.

Localizing your website turns you into a local business, which boosts conversions because many people want to buy locally, you get more traffic from local keywords, and you have an easier time building brand awareness.

14. Localization makes your local marketing stronger.

When you have a website specific to a certain area’s language and culture, your local internet marketing efforts (including search engine optimization, directory listings, and social media) benefit from having a local resource to point visitors to.

15. It makes you more trustworthy and credible.

By using the area’s local slang, idioms, metaphors, and figures of speech, you can communicate with your target customers more easily and directly, reducing confusion and boosting your own reputation.

16. Localization appeals to more customers.

Most web users don’t buy products online in a language other than their own. By offering them that option, you attract more prospects and close more sales.

17. It means fewer abandoned carts.

Programming can be as much a barrier as language or culture. Localization includes proper programming to prevent backend problems such as forms that make it difficult to input personal and payment info. Fewer problems means more closed sales and higher average order value.

18. Localization makes payment easier.

When you enable local credit cards, shipping and tax codes, and buying practices, your localized websites attract customers that would shop elsewhere otherwise, boosting your ROI, conversions, and revenue.

19. It increases local sales.

Offering products, support, FAQs, and other information in your customers’ native languages makes them more likely to buy from you because they have all the information they need in a format they understand to make an informed purchase.

20. Localization increases revenue.

Most consumers care more about language than price. So even if they know they can find a product cheaper somewhere else, they are more likely to buy from you at full price if you have a localized website for them.



Monday, 16 February 2015

The Science of Shopping Cart Abandonment eBook and infographic

Shopping cart abandonment — when shoppers put items in their online shopping carts, but then leave before completing the purchase — is the bane of the online retail industry.

But it's also a huge opportunity: Approximately $4 trillion worth of merchandise will be abandoned in online shopping carts this year, and about 63% of that is potentially recoverable by savvy online retailers, according to BI Intelligence estimates. 



Many eCommerce websites now are building (or using) Cart Abandonment Software to capture some of the leaked opportunities.

There are many APIs that can be used on your eCommerce website to capture back abandoned carts:
Somone of them charge you for the actual recovered carts.
  1. http://rejoiner.com/
  2. http://www.barilliance.com/shopping-cart-abandonment/
  3. http://abandonaid.com/
  4. http://cartrescuer.com/




Thursday, 12 February 2015

Content is God

We all know for sure that Content is said to be the king of SEO. But I will prove to you in the coming 3 minutes that it is not just a King but God.

Good content is that that helps your customers and potential customers. A blog you write, a video you create, or an ebook you giveaway should be all about giving and nothing but giving.

Most new marketing and advertising strategies now know how important free content is, so they try their best to "manipulate" it and use it as a "bait" to attract people and after they are hooked in they ask them to "Pay the Money" whether through premium services or simply via advertisements.

I am not saying that advertising is wrong and paid services are evil. of course not. What I mean is that when you think content generation, your mindset needs to be focused on giving a true value not exploiting the readers/users/viewers. Think of it as charity!



God is Love: How does God Define Love? 

The Bible tells us that "God is Love" (1 John 4:8). But how? The most well known verse is John 3:16, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." 

So one way God defines love is in the act of giving. However, what God gave (or should we say, "who" God gave) was not a mere gift-wrapped present; God sacrificed His only Son so that we, who put our faith in His Son, will not spend eternity separated from Him.

Another great verse about God's love is found in Romans 5:8, "But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." In this verse and in John 3:16, we find no conditions placed on God's love for us. God doesn't say, "as soon as you clean up your act, I'll love you; " nor does He say, "I'll sacrifice my Son if you promise to love Me." In fact, in Romans 5:8, we find just the opposite. God wants us to know that His love is unconditional, so He sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to die for us while we were still unlovable sinners. We didn't have to get clean, and we didn't have to make any promises to God before we could experience His love. His love for us has always existed, and because of that, He did all the giving and sacrificing long before we were even aware that we needed His love. 

God is Love: It's Unconditional 

God is Love, and His love is very different from human love. God's love is unconditional, and it's not based on feelings or emotions. He doesn't love us because we're lovable or because we make Him feel good; He loves us because He is love. He created us to have a loving relationship with Him, and He sacrificed His own Son (who also willingly died for us) to restore that relationship. - 

God is Love: True Love Only Comes Through a Relationship With Him

God is Love! As such, true love -- God's love -- can be summed up in this passage of scripture: "Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one another" (1 John 4:7-11). 

Conclusion

Your content is your expression of unconditional love, you expect nothing in return.
Moreover, your content is not just an act of one way giving, but an act of building a strong and passionate relationship. And finally, every time you post a piece of content, it has to be a masterpiece, a sort of sacrifice of time and resources for the sake of those you love.

Inspired by: Neil Patel, the generous content provider. 

Friday, 6 February 2015

Google Analytics Adds Basic Cohort Analysis (Beta)

In statistical analysis, a cohort is a group of people or subjects who all share some time-bound event, characteristic, or experience. For example, shoppers who visit an ecommerce site for the first time on January 30, 2015 could be said to be a cohort since they have a shared characteristic — they visited for the first time — and the experience was during the same time period, Friday, January 30. Cohort analysis is, perhaps, most useful when two or more cohorts are compared. This comparison lets marketers and analysts see the relationship between the two cohorts over time.


The Analytics’ cohort report can be configured around cohort type, cohort size, metric, and date range.

  • Cohort type. At the time of writing, the only available cohort type was acquisition date, thus one could look at how folks who visited the site on a particular date behaved over time.
  • Cohort size. This report attribute may be set to day, week, or month. In the email example above, each cohort was defined by folks who registered in January. It may be the case that if Google added additional cohort types, it would also expand the list of available cohort sizes to include other sorts of dimensions.
  • Metric. This is simply the thing one wants to measure. Presently, metrics include conversions per user, page views per user, sessions per user, user retention, goal completion, conversion, and more.
  • Date range. The relative date range for the data to be displayed.


The cohort analysis can also be run across segments. As an example, one could look at the average session duration for visitors on mobile devices versus visitors using desktop computers. Or cohorts could be based on new visitor acquisitions the week before Christmas 2014, the week including Christmas, and the week after.



This example shows session duration for three cohorts.

Doing this analysis, we might learn that visitors using desktop computers generally spend more time on site than do visitors on mobile devices and that this effect is even more extreme during the week before Christmas.



Wednesday, 4 February 2015

SEO Friendly Infinite Scroll

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.com, NBCNews.com andLATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Time.com

Since its March redesign, Time.com’s bounce rate — the percentage of visitors who leave the site after viewing only one page — has declined by 15 percentage points, according to managing editor Edward Felsenthal. The percentage of desktop visitors going to another piece of content jumped 21 percentage points between February and May.

Felsenthal attributed that to the continuous scroll, which provides a clickless path for readers to reach another story. He said the left rail, which serves as a “traveling homepage” of links to the top stories of the moment, also helped.

The fact that Time.com queues up top stories, not related stories, is crucial to the site’s strategy for serving social visitors, Felsenthal said: “In many ways the major objective of our redesign was to showcase for those users the full Time offering.”

NBC News
The redesigned NBC News takes a different approach from Time. Article pages transition into related stories, not top stories. And some stories are compiled into “storylines,” so if you’re interested in “hot cars and kids,” you can read a stack of more than 30 stories.
Mobile page views in June were up 30 percent over the previous 12-month average, according to an NBC News spokesperson. On average, NBC News readers on desktop and mobile are seeing nearly 20 percent more pages per visit than before the site’s February redesign.
Los Angeles Times
The LA Times redesign is less seamless than the other two in terms of transitioning quickly to the next piece of content. There’s a choose-your-own-adventure quality to the layout; non-blog stories transition into a section page instead of another article page based on which section you choose.
That gives readers more control over where the site takes them next, but requiring readers to choose what they see next adds some friction that the other sites lack.
A spokesperson for the LA Times said it was too early to share specifics about how the newspaper’s new site is performing. She summed up the goals of the May redesign:
• Eradicating print-centric and antiquated web concepts, such as “the fold,” “the jump,” “endless clicking” and “the dead end” with endless scrolling and multi-directional navigation
• Seamlessly pathing readers from one piece of content to the next, with section fronts and article pages anchored by a row of thumbnails that automatically transport readers to related coverage or other sections
Quartz, Fortune, and Cosmopolitan
The homepage-less Quartz is a clear influence here, particularly for Time. Whatever page you arrive on via social media occupies the top spot in the story stack, with top news — not related stories — below. Editorial news judgment plays a big role in the reader’s experience.

Quartz senior editor Zach Seward said it’s nice to see others emulate one of his site’s signature features: “It must mean we’re onto something.” He also said he doesn’t like the term “infinite scroll”:
The intent is to help users who get to the end of a story but want to keep reading. Some sites have dead ends, others create paralysis of choice. We choose to quietly suggest just one more story, which users can easily scroll into or just ignore. It’s all about that one moment rather some kind of infinite experience.

Seward recently told Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton that Quartz estimates “readers view about 50 percent more stories per visit than they would without the option to scroll.” And, Seward said, “When people choose to read another story on Quartz, about 80 percent do so by scrolling, as opposed to clicking on a headline.”

Time Inc.’s Money and Fortune have also adopted the Quartz-inspired Time.com template for their redesigns. And at the “sexy new Cosmopolitan.com”, a long stack of related stories is presented to readers at the bottom of article pages.

The article page is the new homepage, so what goes on underneath articles seems to be the paramount concern when redesigning a media site in 2014. Some, like Time and Quartz, choose to “quietly suggest” a particular story. Others, like the LA Times and Cosmo, are using the space below stories to offer lots of choices for readers. But all of them have redesigned with an eye toward that second click or page view.

10 Essentials in Implementing a SEO-Effective Infinite Scroll

The Infinite Scroll is becoming increasingly used in Web design. In fact, many businesses are choosing this feature for their websites, either to provide a different experience to users or to stay up-to-date with the latest digital trends. While it can be beneficial to adopt Infinite Scroll, it is important that its implementation takes into account the best SEO and usability practices.

The Main Issue: Indexing

In terms of SEO, one of the major challenges that you may encounter in trying to implement Infinite Scroll is indexing. The issue stems from the fact that Google does not allow the JavaScript download to display content found below a Web page that was programmed in Infinite Scroll. As a result, when the search engine lands on your Web page, it will only see the content that is first presented to the user; the content that is visible without having to scroll. To address this shortcoming, you must help Google detect your entire website’s content to effectively index your website and promote visibility between internal pages. You can do this by implementing an interlinking strategy.

Interlinking: The Solution to Indexing

An interlinking strategy is necessary to promote effective indexing to your website’s pages. By allowing Google to effectively crawl internal pages, you can ensure your website’s domain authority will remain high.

Classic Pagination

The first step to an effective interlinking strategy (when implementing Infinite Scroll), is to use a system of classic pagination. Pagination not only allows for a better crawling of pages (as mentioned above), but it is also necessary for users who turned off JavaScript display on their Web browser for whatever reason.
By adopting a classic navigation system, we help Google access all content on your website. As a result in the search engines, your website appears completely normal without any third-party technology such as Infinite Scroll. You no longer have to be concerned about your content being detected.
The following provides practical tips on how to implement classic pagination with Infinite Scroll.
As the image above indicates, the key to successful pagination is to first divide the content into unique segments, while carefully avoiding the possibility of duplicate content. Next, one should have a unique URL per page (ex. site.com/page/1, site.com/page/2, etc.) and a unique title per page (ex. website – Page 1, website – Page 2, etc.). It is necessary to present search engines and users with navigational numbered links toward other pages. There should be at least one "Back" link and one "Next" link.
Furthermore, you must use the REL and CANONICAL meta tags in the pagination system to properly segment the process, ensure there are no issues with browsing and indexing, and to avoid the possibility of duplicate pages. You must also ensure that off limit pages all give a 404 error. Why?
"JavaScript code which is too complex or arcane could also prevent rendering the page fully and accurately." — Google Webmaster Central Blog, May 23, 2014

Too Complex or Arcane?

Without classic pagination, the Google bot will not be able to access your content. Infinite Scroll requires a scrolling interaction that the robot in theory cannot execute. No scrolling, no content. No content, no search results.

Other Interlinking Elements

The following is a list of other key elements that need to be implemented to ensure proper indexing:
  • Well-segmented categorization: Segmentation of your content should be structured appropriately with categories and tags.
  • Well-structured menus: Do not be afraid to include in your menus all the internal pages that you think are pertinent (categories, tags, articles, etc.)
  • Interlinking module: An effective and popular technique for executing a good interlinking strategy is the use of an automatic module. For example, inserting a "related post" or "random articles" script at the end of a blog article will allow the wide distribution of pages with a high domain authority. This brings optimal indexing, and gives fresh impetus to forgotten older articles.
  • Avoid no-follow links: Surprisingly, many sites use the no-follow attribute on their own internal links. This practice basically indicates to Google that you do not trust pages that are internal to your website.
  • Sitemap: Including a sitemap on your website will help the indexing of your site.

Infinite Scroll as a Progressive Improvement

Infinite Scroll should be implemented as a "progressive improvement"; that is, it should function as an additional feature available to users that support it, without penalizing others or changing the technical structure of the site.

Asynchronous Download

For a "progressively improving" implementation, an Infinite Scroll has to load the required JavaScript elements necessary for asynchronous operation. Here is an overview of Infinite Scroll in asynchronous mode:

  1. The user requests a page (eg: site.com/page/3) and gets the content of this page.
  2. When it reaches the limits of content while scrolling, a JavaScript function will run, requiring new content from the server.
  3. When the server responds with the new content, another JavaScript function interprets the data and injects it into the HTML page.
  4. When there is more content to download, the server responds with a 404 error message that will not be shown to the user. Rather, we will post a notice that the content is exhausted. This feature works for both a scroll up as a scroll down.

Preloading and Caching

The asynchronous download can cause delays in the content display depending on the server’s response time. Therefore, we must use preloading and caching. The purpose of preloading is to download the adjacent content preventatively to minimize the new contents’ loading time. Caching’s purpose is to keep asynchronously downloaded content in memory.

Browsing States

1. History API (Or "FOR THE LOVE OF GOD DON’T BREAK THE BACK BUTTON")

The Infinite Scroll is definitely a plus for continuous navigation, but what about "segmented" navigation? If a user scrolls for several sections, finds an interesting link and clicks it, then returns to the Infinite Scroll, what happens?
If a user visits your site, leaves, then comes back a few days later and tries to find a certain piece of content, what is their experience? How will they know where to go? The answers to these questions are found in the History.pushState.

2. History.pushState

History.pushState lets you change the URL in the address bar dynamically. When the user scrolls and reaches a new section, the address bar will change. The pushState then creates a new state in the browser navigation history. If the user clicks on the back button, it will be up to the previous URL we populate via pushState.
history.pushState(stateObject, title, URL);
window.onpopstate = function(event) {
window.location = window.location; }
Sites like Facebook and 9gag demonstrate the importance of this practice. If you scroll far down on the site page with Infinite Scroll, then accidentally press the "Back" button and return immediately to the site, you will return to the very top of the scroll instead of exactly where you left off.

SEO Benefits?

The implementation of an Infinite Scroll, when well established, will not influence the SEO performance of a website. The major advantage however, lies in optimizing conversions (depending, of course, on the objectives of the website in question!).
For example, one of the most documented cases is that of TIME Magazine, which managed to reduce its bounce rate by 15 percent simply through the implementation of an Infinite Scroll. The reason being is when users enter the Time.com website, they browse through several different pages of content without realizing they have changed pages multiple times. This increases the likelihood that they will view many content pages on the website during their visit. The main lesson learned in all of this is that a user is extremely lazy, and it’s up to you to make it as easy as possible for them to go through your content!
Thus, the implementation of an Infinite Scroll on your website may allow you to decrease your bounce rate and increase the amount of content being viewed, as well as the number of pageviews. This can be extremely interesting for sites whose main income comes from advertising with CPM ads (if the advertisement reloads when users change pages with Infinite Scroll).

Conclusion

In summary, the implementation of Infinite Scroll on your website may benefit the user experience and increase conversions, provided you follow best Web development practices. By following the advice shared in this article, you can easily avoid falling into the trap of not indexing. You will also be able to give more weight to your internal pages and much more easily achieve your conversion goals. The Infinite Scroll will help achieve conversions if set up based on UX best practices.

References

  • Francis Roussin, earned media advisor, and Philippe Vachon-Rivard, front-end developer at iProspect, also contributed to this post.
  • http://searchenginewatch.com/sew/how-to/2392566/10-essentials-in-implementing-a-seo-effective-infinite-scroll
  • http://www.poynter.org/news/mediawire/257466/time-coms-bounce-rate-down-15-percentage-points-since-adopting-continuous-scroll/

Google Study: PPC and SEO for Branded KWs is better than Just SEO

It used to confuse me before, why would I add my brand keywords or keywords that I am already on top of SERPs for in my PPC campaign? I was thinking that people are going to click on my links automatically because they are already on top.
But I still ran the camapigns with those KWs, just to prevent competitors taking them.
Then I found an inetresting study to justify the paid clicks on branded and organically ranked KWs:

The study which was conducted by Google concluded that 50 percent of clicks generated by paid ads are not replaced by organic clicks when the ads are absent and the website has a first position organic search ranking. The study also shows that as the organic search ranking decreases, the percentage of clicks not replaced by the paid ad increases. This implies that organic search alone cannot drive as much traffic to a website as organic search combined with paid search.
Here is the Abstract:

Impact Of Ranking Of Organic Search Results On The Incrementality Of Search Ads

Abstract: In an earlier study, we reported that on average 89% of the visits to the advertiser’s site from search ad clicks were incremental. In this research, we examine how the ranking of an advertiser’s organic listings on the search results page affects the incrementality of ad clicks expressed through Incremental Ad Clicks (IAC) and as estimated by Search Ads Pause models. A meta-analysis of 390 Search Ads Pause studies highlights the limited opportunity for clicks from organic search results to substitute for ad clicks when the ads are turned off. On average, 81% of ad impressions and 66% of ad clicks occur in the absence of an associated organic search result. We find that having an associated organic search result in rank one does not necessarily mean a low IAC. On average, 50% of the ad clicks that occur with a top rank organic result are incremental, compared to 100% of the ad clicks being incremental in the absence of an associated organic result.


Impact Of Ranking Of Organic Search Results On The Incrementality Of Search Ads

Friday, 9 January 2015

How to Make The Analytics ROBOT to send virtual traffic To Any Site or Track Visits to Your Physical Rooms!!!

Ever wondered how traffic bots work? How come you put any URL in this simple app and you receive thousands and thousands of hits (seen on Analytics) with any parameters or metrics you like.
You can identify which pages receive the traffic, session duration, used device, screen res., even IP, medium, source, etc. So you can actually see in your traffic reports on GA that you've received your traffic from CNN, NY Times, Yahoo, or even Google.

The way such traffic bots work is very simple and straightforward and can used to trigger traffic signals from almost anything.

Here is the HOW it Works:

It sends a 'get request' through the Measurement HTTP Protocol using to GA servers on its URL:

For Example:

http://www.google-analytics.com/collect
?v=1
&tid=UA-xxxxxxxx-x
&cid=123456789
&t=pageview
&dp=/anysubpage





All what you have to do is to put this in the address bar of your browser and press Enter:

http://www.google-analytics.com/collect?v=1&tid=UA-XXXX-Y&cid=555&sr=800x600&t=pageview&dh=mydemo.com&dp=/home&dt=homepage

You can find all the Parameters here: 
https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/protocol/v1/parameters 


Now you understood the logic, you can run this request through a very simple app that changes the CID and sends the request automatically via a list of proxies, or instead you can build this small device and... 






YOU CAN TRACK YOUR HOME VISITS WITH GOOGLE ANALYTICS and see how many rooms are visited the most!!



Full details are here: http://nicomiceli.com/tracking-your-home-with-google-analytics/


Resources:

  1. https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/protocol/v1/devguide
  2. https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/protocol/v1/reference
  3. https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/analyticsjs/
  4. http://www.optimizesmart.com/understanding-universal-analytics-measurement-protocol/
  5. http://www.koozai.com/blog/analytics/google-analytics-and-cookies/
  6. http://www.koozai.com/blog/analytics/universal-analytics-and-cookies/

A Checklist Before buying a Used Domain

Whether it is a .com or dot anything, you need to be sure that the domain you are paying a lot of money in is safe and worth every penny you are putting in it.

Buying a used domain is like buying an expensive used car, it may look fancy but you don't know what is under the hood. So, you need to check everything, get a report, and be comfortable knowing that the domain you are driving won't run into an accident in the future because you did not spend one hour doing some check-ups.

The following 14 points is my checklist, you can use it as is, or add more to it if you like:

  1. site: search on the domain name in Google, Bing
  2. info: Search
  3. Google the domain name and check reputation
  4. Keyword search volume, and competition (AdWords KW Planner)
  5. Check the Domain age http://moonsy.com/domain_age/
  6. Check the way back machine at Archive.org
  7. Check robots.txt file and see if archive.org is disabled
  8. Check Backlinks quantity and quality
  9. Check domain and IP health and if it is blacklisted http://mxtoolbox.com/
  10. Check domain and IP health on https://www.ultratools.com/domainHealthReport
  11. Check if blacklisted: http://www.blacklistalert.org/
  12. see if the Domain or IP is currently listed in the live Spamhaus Domain Blocklist (DBL) http://www.spamhaus.org/lookup/
  13. check if it is on DMOZ or Yahoo Dir
  14. Find contact info on Whois.net. If not private, run a search on the contact person 


Thursday, 4 December 2014

301 Redirect Old Domain Without Passing Link Juice or Referral Signals

If you're hit by Google algorithm's Penguin and tried your best to disavow all the "Bad" links coming to your site, but your site has not been recovered yet, then you might be thinking of starting a new website with clean backlinks portfolio and White Hat SEO.

Of course you do not want your visitors to go to the old abandoned site, and of course you cannot 301 redirect the old domain to the new one, or else you will be transferring all the harmful link signals with you.

So, the best technique to do (after you've decided to start a fresh site) is do this simple yet very effective technique:

1- get a new domain name to use as intermediary  (Example: www.oldsite2.com)
2- Add a Robots.txt file and make the root domain (of the intermediary site) Disallowed

User-agent:*
Disallow: / 

3- Redirect (301) the old domain to the intermediary. 
4- Permananetly redirect (301) the intermediary to the brand new domain



More to do:

You can also:
1- Add a robots.txt file to the old site to deindex it from search engines (follow step 2)
2- Use Google's URL removal tool and remove all the URLS of the old site.


A Fresh Beginning:

Now it is a new opportunity to start fresh with a new domain, new content, and better strategy.



Short Story Long:

  • http://searchenginewatch.com/sew/how-to/2355513/youve-been-hit-by-penguin-should-you-start-over-or-try-to-recover
  • http://searchenginewatch.com/sew/how-to/2384644/can-you-safely-redirect-users-from-a-penguin-hit-site-to-a-new-domain

A FREE tool to find Competitors SEO Backlinks! A Working Experiment

Dan Petrovic did a very interesting experiment that actually gave him insights on which sites are linking to a specific website that he was experimenting on.

What he simply did was replicating this site. Yes that is it.

He found on GWMT that Google is passing all the original site's backlinks to the replica. Why would Google do that? I have no idea!


The "intermediate link" is the original site that has been duplicated.

find the whole experiment on DajenSEO Blog here

Wednesday, 8 October 2014

Advanced tips and tricks for students conducting online search with Google - infographic

As I am back to school studying Business Administration and have a loot of research to do, my wife sent me an interesting infographic she's stumbled upon this morning to help students (like me) better harness Google to conduct all their academic research "Professionally" and smartly.

EnJoY!





source:http://www.hackcollege.com/blog/2011/11/23/infographic-get-more-out-of-google.html

Friday, 3 October 2014

20 Reasons why Localization is Important to Website Conversion

Thanks to the global reach of the internet, website localization is one of the best things you can do to increase website conversions. By creating a culture- and language-specific version of your website for each demographic market you target, you become a truly international business. All businesses, even small online retailers, can benefit from localization. In fact, you can’t afford not to have localized websites, and here are 20 reasons why.

1. It offers global expansion and increased reach.

Although English is still the predominant language online, other languages, most notably Chinese, Spanish, French, and Arabic, are quickly closing the distance. Offering web content in additional languages and cultures helps you increase your reach and become a respected international business.

2. Localization helps you appeal to multicultural audiences.

Translation helps international visitors find and buy from you, but it doesn’t consider cultural differences and sometimes doesn’t convey your message or brand very well. Localization includes both cultural and linguistic concerns, helping you reach audiences in different cultures much better.

3. It increases web traffic.

Search engines rank websites with localized versions or pages higher than non-localized websites and return your website as a result more often. On top of that, local sites are more likely to link to you when you provide information in the local language. Increasing traffic is one of the three most important things you can do to boost revenue, and more traffic means more sales.

4. You get more traffic from regional and language-specific search engines.

These smaller search engines have much less competition because they’re small and most businesses don’t have localized websites to appear in results. This means it’s much easier for your localized websites to rank higher than your English website. The higher you rank and the more often your website appears in search results, the more traffic and sales you get.

5. Localization increases brand recognition.

When you translate your website into the language and culture of your target market, you show that you respect and value your audience. They in turn are more aware of your business than your English-only competitors because they see your website more often and more easily understand your message.

6. Localization increases website stickiness and sales.

Having a strong localization plan boosts your presence and sales in a targeted area, such as localizing in French and German to increase sales in Europe. Multiple studies have found that when users are presented with a website in their native language, they stay on the site twice as long and are four times more likely to make a purchase from it.

7. It increases overall ROI.

Increased traffic, conversions, and brand awareness also leads to increased trust, credibility, customer loyalty, and satisfaction, in turn leading to more conversions. Localization is also scalable for both your audience and your budget, delivering huge benefits for only a marginal additional cost.

8. Localization maintains low printing and content distribution costs.

Localizing your website increases reach without raising these costs a few ways. First, you can reuse much of the same content across multiple languages; second, translating your website into a new language and culture is scalable; finally, having a web presence costs the same no matter what language or culture. Having a localized website may also eliminate the need for direct mail such as catalogs and brochures in various languages.

9. It is a cost-effective virtual branch office or satellite location.

Instead of building a brick-and-mortar store or renting an office in an international location, your localized websites become those virtual stores by offering information, products, contacts, and everything else you can deliver digitally.

10. Localization lowers customer support costs.

By answering questions and providing information in a target market’s native language and culture, you give customers what they need online in the best format for them, which reduces the need for multilingual phone and chat support.

11. It allows you to target minorities in your own area.

Many countries have large subgroups with their own languages, cultures, and skyrocketing purchasing power, such as the Latino market in the USA. Creating localized websites for these groups helps you solidify your presence and boost sales in your own area.

12. Localization maintains brand image and voice across cultures.

The problem with straight translation is that it doesn’t consider cultural differences and doesn’t always maintain your branding message. Localization is better than translation because it considers communication, sales incentive, design, layout, and programming specific to each culture and area, so you don’t lose the integrity of your brand across languages.

13. You become a local business.

Localizing your website turns you into a local business, which boosts conversions because many people want to buy locally, you get more traffic from local keywords, and you have an easier time building brand awareness.

14. Localization makes your local marketing stronger.

When you have a website specific to a certain area’s language and culture, your local internet marketing efforts (including search engine optimization, directory listings, and social media) benefit from having a local resource to point visitors to.

15. It makes you more trustworthy and credible.

By using the area’s local slang, idioms, metaphors, and figures of speech, you can communicate with your target customers more easily and directly, reducing confusion and boosting your own reputation.

16. Localization appeals to more customers.

Most web users don’t buy products online in a language other than their own. By offering them that option, you attract more prospects and close more sales.

17. It means fewer abandoned carts.

Programming can be as much a barrier as language or culture. Localization includes proper programming to prevent backend problems such as forms that make it difficult to input personal and payment info. Fewer problems means more closed sales and higher average order value.

18. Localization makes payment easier.

When you enable local credit cards, shipping and tax codes, and buying practices, your localized websites attract customers that would shop elsewhere otherwise, boosting your ROI, conversions, and revenue.

19. It increases local sales.

Offering products, support, FAQs, and other information in your customers’ native languages makes them more likely to buy from you because they have all the information they need in a format they understand to make an informed purchase.

20. Localization increases revenue.

Most consumers care more about language than price. So even if they know they can find a product cheaper somewhere else, they are more likely to buy from you at full price if you have a localized website for them.



Friday, 26 September 2014

How to know where your visitors go when they leave your website?

How can I see which specific pages/URLs people visit after leaving my site? In other words, I can see the percentage of people that EXIT on a certain page, but I want to be able to see which links on an exit page they follow (i.e. what percent of the visitors to a certain page of our site click on each outbound link on our page)? Or are they just leaving our site without necessarily visiting an outside site we've linked to?

Short Answer: You add this code to your link so it looks like:

<a href="http://www.example.com/" onClick="javascript: pageTracker._trackPageview('/example');">Co name or link info</a>

Will show up in Google Analytics as a page view.

Detailed Answer: (From Google Support) 


You can customize your Google Analytics tracking code to find out when users click outbound links, or links that take users to a website other than your own.
This article gives you an example of how to set up outbound link tracking. This is a two-step process, and you need to follow both steps complete the process.
You must have Google Analytics account and the web tracking code set up before you can track outbound links. You should have a basic knowledge of HTML and JavaScript or work with a developer to complete the set up.

Step 1: Set up an Event to track outbound links

Event tracking is a way you can track user interactions that aren’t automatically collected by the Google Analytics tracking code snippet, including clicks to outbound links. Learn more about Event tracking.
You can copy and paste the example below into your own pages to set up Event tracking for outbound links. We recommend you put this script in your page headers, but not within the basic Google Analytics tracking code snippet.
When you set up an Event, you must define values for the Event components. The Event components define how the data appears in your reports. In this example, the CategoryAction, and Label are defined (in bold). You can use these values, or change them and define your own values. Learn more about Event components or refer to our Developer Guides for more technical information on the Event tracking.
The changes you need to make to your web pages depend on which tracking code you’re using. See if you have Classic Analytics (ga.js) or Universal Analytics (analytics.js).
This example uses Event tracking for Universal Analytics. If you’re using Classic Analytics, refer to our Developer Guides for more information on how to track outbound links with Events using the ga.js JavaScript library.
<script>
/**
* Function that tracks a click on an outbound link in Google Analytics.
* This function takes a valid URL string as an argument, and uses that URL string
* as the event label.
*/
var trackOutboundLink = function(url) {
   ga('send', 'event', 'outbound', 'click', url, {'hitCallback':
     function () {
     document.location = url;
     }
   });
}
</script>

Step 2: Add the onclick attribute to your outbound links

After you have Event tracking set up (Step 1), you must also add (or modify) the onclick attribute to your links. This is how data from a specific link gets sent to Google Analytics.
Use this example as a model for your own links:
<a href="http://www.example.com" onclick=”trackOutboundLink(‘http://www.example.com’); return false;">Check out example.com</a>

Additional resources (for developers)

This example includes the hitCallback field, which tells Google Analytics when the user interaction is complete., and uses the trackOutboundLink() as the JavaScript function. This makes sure that you collect the interaction data before the user leaves your site.
For more information on how this works, refer to the hitCallback reference in our Developer Guides.

This tutorial describes how to track outgoing links using the NEW Google Universal Analytics.js code, commonly called Analytics.js or UA. If you are using the OLD ga.js code click here.
This guide describes how to track outgoing links using Google Universal Analytics or commonly known as Analytics.js - the NEW (since late 2013) tracking that Google provides it's webmasters.
If the tracking code you use on your website starts with
(function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function()
... then you are using the NEW Analytics.js code and you can continue reading below.
If however your tracking code starts with
var _gaq=_gaq||[];
... then you are using the OLD Google Analytics code, and you should refer to the other guide: Track outbound links with Google Analytics (ga.js)
Since Google introduced the Asynchronous Tracking method, one of the most common questions is: "how do I track outgoing links"? The solution is quite simple, one has to track outgoing links as events (found in Google Analytics under Behavior - Events). The problem however is that it does not always work for everyone, the reason being that events are only recorded once a link is clicked. If that link takes you away from a page (such as an outgoing link in the same window), that tracking event often does not have time to register with the analytics server before the new page starts to load and the tracking request cancelled.
In order to ensure that tracking is done properly, we either have to ensure that the target window is a new window (eg: _blank), or delay the opening of the link by about half a second, giving your browser enough time to register the event and load the tracking url.
The best method of "auto-tracking" outgoing links is to automatically detect outbound links with JavaScript when they are clicked, and automatically track that event. That tracking event should first check to see whether that link is destined to open in a new window (target="_blank"), and:
  • If yes, register the track, and open the link in the new window
  • If no, register the track and delay opening the link by half a second, then proceed to open that link.
This method is by far the most robust, and simply means you need to include an external JavaScript file on your pages.
function _gaLt(event){
    var el = event.srcElement || event.target;

    /* Loop up the tree through parent elements if clicked element is not a link (eg: an image inside a link) */
    while(el && (typeof el.tagName == 'undefined' || el.tagName.toLowerCase() != 'a' || !el.href))
        el = el.parentNode;

    if(el && el.href){
        if(el.href.indexOf(location.host) == -1){ /* external link */
            ga("send", "event", "Outgoing Links", el.href, document.location.pathname + document.location.search);
            /* if target not set then delay opening of window by 0.5s to allow tracking */
            if(!el.target || el.target.match(/^_(self|parent|top)$/i)){
                setTimeout(function(){
                    document.location.href = el.href;
                }.bind(el),500);
                /* Prevent standard click */
                event.preventDefault ? event.preventDefault() : event.returnValue = !1;
            }
        }

    }
}

/* Attach the event to all clicks in the document after page has loaded */
var w = window;
w.addEventListener ? w.addEventListener("load",function(){document.body.addEventListener("click",_gaLt,!1)},!1)
  : w.attachEvent && w.attachEvent("onload",function(){document.body.attachEvent("onclick",_gaLt)});
If you are wanting to track links manually (ie: in the code), an outbound link on your website should look something like this:
<a href="http://outgoinglink.com"
   onclick="ga('send','event','Outgoing Links','outgoinglink.com')" target="_blank">Link Text</a>
What this will do (when clicked) is track an event called "outgoing_links" as "outgoinglink.com". This means that in your Google Analytics account, which has an "Event Tracking" section, you now get a category called "Outgoing Links" containing an action (and total recorded) of outgoing links. Please note the target="_blank" as this ensures your web browser is kept open and the event is able to register.
Using this new method, you can theoretically track anything on your website, including downloads, videos, etc. You just need to assign an "onclick" event with your own category and "description" (action), such as:
<a href="/myfiles/mypdf.pdf"
 onclick="ga('send','event','downloads','/myfiles/mypdf.pdf')" target="_blank">Link Text</a>