Friday, 10 October 2014

2 WordPress Tools to Increase Leads and Customers

One of my favorite things in my job is that I get to stumble upon hundreds of websites every month. And what is even more special is that most of these websites are owned by Marketing, SEO, or Advertising companies; so they have a lot of hands on the trending tools to capture more visits, enhance their sites' quality or to change their visits into revenue.

As everyone now is familiar with creating a cheap and quick, yet professional and responsive website, through WordPress themes and Plugins, You can see how quick ideas are turning into.. Plugins. :)

And with that in mind, it was a big catch for me to find The Theme and plugin detector tool for WordPress, WPThemeDetector.

Psst. If you want to know if the site is using Wordpres or a different CMS, there is a Chrome extension for that, called Wappalyzer

With the help of my 2 friends (WPTD and Wappalyzer) I was able to discover a lot of new and amazing themes and plugins.

Anywho, today I would love to introduce 2 plugins that will start seeing them more frequently because of their great value capturing more leads.


1- LEadIN.com 

When someone submits a form on your WordPress site, you want to know more about them. What pages they've visited, when they return, and what social networks they’re on. With this new WordPress marketing automation and lead tracking plugin you will get all the details you need to make your next move. "Because business isn’t business unless it’s personal." Well. that is what they said. :)
You can see how it looks like on my other blog here

2- OptinMonster

I am sure many of you know (or at least have heard of BounceExchange) or the Exit intent technology to capture visitors who are about to leave the site. But the problem with BE is that it is very expensive almost 3K$/month. (Although it is worth it because of all the efforts these guys do in A/B testing). OptinMonster on the other hand is way cheaper and most importantly is a WP plugin. 

OptinMonster is a lead-generation plugin for WordPress that allows you to easily create and integrate highly effective optin forms on your website. It integrates with all major email service providers, and it comes with powerful features such as page-level targeting, A/B split testing, and exit-intent technology.

Its price starts with 49$ and up to 349$ depends on the plan.



If you like this strategy to capture visitors, you can find more Exit-intent tools here


Wednesday, 8 October 2014

Advanced tips and tricks for students conducting online search with Google - infographic

As I am back to school studying Business Administration and have a loot of research to do, my wife sent me an interesting infographic she's stumbled upon this morning to help students (like me) better harness Google to conduct all their academic research "Professionally" and smartly.

EnJoY!





source:http://www.hackcollege.com/blog/2011/11/23/infographic-get-more-out-of-google.html

Friday, 3 October 2014

20 Reasons why Localization is Important to Website Conversion

Thanks to the global reach of the internet, website localization is one of the best things you can do to increase website conversions. By creating a culture- and language-specific version of your website for each demographic market you target, you become a truly international business. All businesses, even small online retailers, can benefit from localization. In fact, you can’t afford not to have localized websites, and here are 20 reasons why.

1. It offers global expansion and increased reach.

Although English is still the predominant language online, other languages, most notably Chinese, Spanish, French, and Arabic, are quickly closing the distance. Offering web content in additional languages and cultures helps you increase your reach and become a respected international business.

2. Localization helps you appeal to multicultural audiences.

Translation helps international visitors find and buy from you, but it doesn’t consider cultural differences and sometimes doesn’t convey your message or brand very well. Localization includes both cultural and linguistic concerns, helping you reach audiences in different cultures much better.

3. It increases web traffic.

Search engines rank websites with localized versions or pages higher than non-localized websites and return your website as a result more often. On top of that, local sites are more likely to link to you when you provide information in the local language. Increasing traffic is one of the three most important things you can do to boost revenue, and more traffic means more sales.

4. You get more traffic from regional and language-specific search engines.

These smaller search engines have much less competition because they’re small and most businesses don’t have localized websites to appear in results. This means it’s much easier for your localized websites to rank higher than your English website. The higher you rank and the more often your website appears in search results, the more traffic and sales you get.

5. Localization increases brand recognition.

When you translate your website into the language and culture of your target market, you show that you respect and value your audience. They in turn are more aware of your business than your English-only competitors because they see your website more often and more easily understand your message.

6. Localization increases website stickiness and sales.

Having a strong localization plan boosts your presence and sales in a targeted area, such as localizing in French and German to increase sales in Europe. Multiple studies have found that when users are presented with a website in their native language, they stay on the site twice as long and are four times more likely to make a purchase from it.

7. It increases overall ROI.

Increased traffic, conversions, and brand awareness also leads to increased trust, credibility, customer loyalty, and satisfaction, in turn leading to more conversions. Localization is also scalable for both your audience and your budget, delivering huge benefits for only a marginal additional cost.

8. Localization maintains low printing and content distribution costs.

Localizing your website increases reach without raising these costs a few ways. First, you can reuse much of the same content across multiple languages; second, translating your website into a new language and culture is scalable; finally, having a web presence costs the same no matter what language or culture. Having a localized website may also eliminate the need for direct mail such as catalogs and brochures in various languages.

9. It is a cost-effective virtual branch office or satellite location.

Instead of building a brick-and-mortar store or renting an office in an international location, your localized websites become those virtual stores by offering information, products, contacts, and everything else you can deliver digitally.

10. Localization lowers customer support costs.

By answering questions and providing information in a target market’s native language and culture, you give customers what they need online in the best format for them, which reduces the need for multilingual phone and chat support.

11. It allows you to target minorities in your own area.

Many countries have large subgroups with their own languages, cultures, and skyrocketing purchasing power, such as the Latino market in the USA. Creating localized websites for these groups helps you solidify your presence and boost sales in your own area.

12. Localization maintains brand image and voice across cultures.

The problem with straight translation is that it doesn’t consider cultural differences and doesn’t always maintain your branding message. Localization is better than translation because it considers communication, sales incentive, design, layout, and programming specific to each culture and area, so you don’t lose the integrity of your brand across languages.

13. You become a local business.

Localizing your website turns you into a local business, which boosts conversions because many people want to buy locally, you get more traffic from local keywords, and you have an easier time building brand awareness.

14. Localization makes your local marketing stronger.

When you have a website specific to a certain area’s language and culture, your local internet marketing efforts (including search engine optimization, directory listings, and social media) benefit from having a local resource to point visitors to.

15. It makes you more trustworthy and credible.

By using the area’s local slang, idioms, metaphors, and figures of speech, you can communicate with your target customers more easily and directly, reducing confusion and boosting your own reputation.

16. Localization appeals to more customers.

Most web users don’t buy products online in a language other than their own. By offering them that option, you attract more prospects and close more sales.

17. It means fewer abandoned carts.

Programming can be as much a barrier as language or culture. Localization includes proper programming to prevent backend problems such as forms that make it difficult to input personal and payment info. Fewer problems means more closed sales and higher average order value.

18. Localization makes payment easier.

When you enable local credit cards, shipping and tax codes, and buying practices, your localized websites attract customers that would shop elsewhere otherwise, boosting your ROI, conversions, and revenue.

19. It increases local sales.

Offering products, support, FAQs, and other information in your customers’ native languages makes them more likely to buy from you because they have all the information they need in a format they understand to make an informed purchase.

20. Localization increases revenue.

Most consumers care more about language than price. So even if they know they can find a product cheaper somewhere else, they are more likely to buy from you at full price if you have a localized website for them.



Friday, 26 September 2014

Neil Patel's infographic for an ideal Blog design - infographic

Here is the latest infographic by Neil Patel showing his fans how an ideal Blog should look like through these eye-catching guidelines.



The Blueprint of an Optimal Blog Design
Courtesy of: Quick Sprout

How to know where your visitors go when they leave your website?

How can I see which specific pages/URLs people visit after leaving my site? In other words, I can see the percentage of people that EXIT on a certain page, but I want to be able to see which links on an exit page they follow (i.e. what percent of the visitors to a certain page of our site click on each outbound link on our page)? Or are they just leaving our site without necessarily visiting an outside site we've linked to?

Short Answer: You add this code to your link so it looks like:

<a href="http://www.example.com/" onClick="javascript: pageTracker._trackPageview('/example');">Co name or link info</a>

Will show up in Google Analytics as a page view.

Detailed Answer: (From Google Support) 


You can customize your Google Analytics tracking code to find out when users click outbound links, or links that take users to a website other than your own.
This article gives you an example of how to set up outbound link tracking. This is a two-step process, and you need to follow both steps complete the process.
You must have Google Analytics account and the web tracking code set up before you can track outbound links. You should have a basic knowledge of HTML and JavaScript or work with a developer to complete the set up.

Step 1: Set up an Event to track outbound links

Event tracking is a way you can track user interactions that aren’t automatically collected by the Google Analytics tracking code snippet, including clicks to outbound links. Learn more about Event tracking.
You can copy and paste the example below into your own pages to set up Event tracking for outbound links. We recommend you put this script in your page headers, but not within the basic Google Analytics tracking code snippet.
When you set up an Event, you must define values for the Event components. The Event components define how the data appears in your reports. In this example, the CategoryAction, and Label are defined (in bold). You can use these values, or change them and define your own values. Learn more about Event components or refer to our Developer Guides for more technical information on the Event tracking.
The changes you need to make to your web pages depend on which tracking code you’re using. See if you have Classic Analytics (ga.js) or Universal Analytics (analytics.js).
This example uses Event tracking for Universal Analytics. If you’re using Classic Analytics, refer to our Developer Guides for more information on how to track outbound links with Events using the ga.js JavaScript library.
<script>
/**
* Function that tracks a click on an outbound link in Google Analytics.
* This function takes a valid URL string as an argument, and uses that URL string
* as the event label.
*/
var trackOutboundLink = function(url) {
   ga('send', 'event', 'outbound', 'click', url, {'hitCallback':
     function () {
     document.location = url;
     }
   });
}
</script>

Step 2: Add the onclick attribute to your outbound links

After you have Event tracking set up (Step 1), you must also add (or modify) the onclick attribute to your links. This is how data from a specific link gets sent to Google Analytics.
Use this example as a model for your own links:
<a href="http://www.example.com" onclick=”trackOutboundLink(‘http://www.example.com’); return false;">Check out example.com</a>

Additional resources (for developers)

This example includes the hitCallback field, which tells Google Analytics when the user interaction is complete., and uses the trackOutboundLink() as the JavaScript function. This makes sure that you collect the interaction data before the user leaves your site.
For more information on how this works, refer to the hitCallback reference in our Developer Guides.

This tutorial describes how to track outgoing links using the NEW Google Universal Analytics.js code, commonly called Analytics.js or UA. If you are using the OLD ga.js code click here.
This guide describes how to track outgoing links using Google Universal Analytics or commonly known as Analytics.js - the NEW (since late 2013) tracking that Google provides it's webmasters.
If the tracking code you use on your website starts with
(function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function()
... then you are using the NEW Analytics.js code and you can continue reading below.
If however your tracking code starts with
var _gaq=_gaq||[];
... then you are using the OLD Google Analytics code, and you should refer to the other guide: Track outbound links with Google Analytics (ga.js)
Since Google introduced the Asynchronous Tracking method, one of the most common questions is: "how do I track outgoing links"? The solution is quite simple, one has to track outgoing links as events (found in Google Analytics under Behavior - Events). The problem however is that it does not always work for everyone, the reason being that events are only recorded once a link is clicked. If that link takes you away from a page (such as an outgoing link in the same window), that tracking event often does not have time to register with the analytics server before the new page starts to load and the tracking request cancelled.
In order to ensure that tracking is done properly, we either have to ensure that the target window is a new window (eg: _blank), or delay the opening of the link by about half a second, giving your browser enough time to register the event and load the tracking url.
The best method of "auto-tracking" outgoing links is to automatically detect outbound links with JavaScript when they are clicked, and automatically track that event. That tracking event should first check to see whether that link is destined to open in a new window (target="_blank"), and:
  • If yes, register the track, and open the link in the new window
  • If no, register the track and delay opening the link by half a second, then proceed to open that link.
This method is by far the most robust, and simply means you need to include an external JavaScript file on your pages.
function _gaLt(event){
    var el = event.srcElement || event.target;

    /* Loop up the tree through parent elements if clicked element is not a link (eg: an image inside a link) */
    while(el && (typeof el.tagName == 'undefined' || el.tagName.toLowerCase() != 'a' || !el.href))
        el = el.parentNode;

    if(el && el.href){
        if(el.href.indexOf(location.host) == -1){ /* external link */
            ga("send", "event", "Outgoing Links", el.href, document.location.pathname + document.location.search);
            /* if target not set then delay opening of window by 0.5s to allow tracking */
            if(!el.target || el.target.match(/^_(self|parent|top)$/i)){
                setTimeout(function(){
                    document.location.href = el.href;
                }.bind(el),500);
                /* Prevent standard click */
                event.preventDefault ? event.preventDefault() : event.returnValue = !1;
            }
        }

    }
}

/* Attach the event to all clicks in the document after page has loaded */
var w = window;
w.addEventListener ? w.addEventListener("load",function(){document.body.addEventListener("click",_gaLt,!1)},!1)
  : w.attachEvent && w.attachEvent("onload",function(){document.body.attachEvent("onclick",_gaLt)});
If you are wanting to track links manually (ie: in the code), an outbound link on your website should look something like this:
<a href="http://outgoinglink.com"
   onclick="ga('send','event','Outgoing Links','outgoinglink.com')" target="_blank">Link Text</a>
What this will do (when clicked) is track an event called "outgoing_links" as "outgoinglink.com". This means that in your Google Analytics account, which has an "Event Tracking" section, you now get a category called "Outgoing Links" containing an action (and total recorded) of outgoing links. Please note the target="_blank" as this ensures your web browser is kept open and the event is able to register.
Using this new method, you can theoretically track anything on your website, including downloads, videos, etc. You just need to assign an "onclick" event with your own category and "description" (action), such as:
<a href="/myfiles/mypdf.pdf"
 onclick="ga('send','event','downloads','/myfiles/mypdf.pdf')" target="_blank">Link Text</a>

Friday, 19 September 2014

SEO Joke: Search Engines and the Happy Birthday card

I don't' know if it is funny or sad. But if this is how SEO works, it would be S.A.D.

The Birthday Card SEO Joke Analogy 


Friday, 5 September 2014

Prevent search engines from displaying DMOZ data in search results for your site


One source Google uses to generate snippets is the Open Directory Project. You can direct us not to use this as a source by adding a meta tag to your pages.

To prevent all search engines (that support the meta tag) from using this information for the page's description, use the following:
<meta name="robots" content="NOODP">


To specifically prevent Google from using this information for a page's description, use the following:
<meta name="googlebot" content="NOODP">


If you use the robots meta tag for other directives, you can combine those. For instance:
<meta name="googlebot" content="NOODP, nofollow">


Note that once you add this meta tag to your pages, it may take some time for changes to your snippets to appear in the index.

Source: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/35624?hl=en

Friday, 4 July 2014

9 Video Marketing Mistakes To Avoid

Creating strong video content for your business is a powerful way to reach a variety of markets and engage your audience. However, when businesses have poorly produced videos they often end up doing more harm than good. Your video is a reflection of your brand so to help ensure that you get off on the right foot with your Video Marketing strategy, here are the top ten mistakes in Video Marketing for you to avoid.

1 Having No Objective

Are you making a video for the sake of it? What is the purpose of your video? Is it good branding? If you have no purpose or objective for your video, then you will never know if you have gained what you set out to achieve. Once you have an aim, you will be able to create a video that will help achieve those aims; for example, you can plan your script and storyboard in accordance with achieving your objectives.

2 Not Branding Your Video

You could create a stunning, very popular video that gets thousands of views but if you don't brand it then you have not produced a successful video. Your audience needs to know who you are so that they can remember you, search for you, purchase from you and even recommend you. If you don’t emphasise your brand or your company name in your video, how are your viewers supposed to know who you are or find you?


3 Making It Too Long

Research tells us that 20% of people click away from a video after just ten seconds if it is not engaging enough and the more time you add to a video, the less likely people are to watch it through to the end. This is really important to consider when producing a video because you will want to ensure that you get all of the messages across quickly and effectively so that your target audience are receiving the messages that you want them to. A well planned video that engages viewers will have more views right to the end.
4 Giving Out Too Many Messages

When producing a successful video you need to have a strong message that you want to convey to your audience. Having a clear objective will help you to understand what message you want to send out. If you give out too many messages in a short period of time, you risk confusing your viewers. They will not know what to take away from your video so it is best to stick to key points. This way your viewers will understand exactly what you want them to.

5 No Call To Action

What action do you want your target market to take after viewing your video? Why not tell them or ask them to perform this? Include a call to action within your video to encourage your audience to take that action. By not leaving a call to action in your video you are leaving your viewers and your target audience with no action to take, meaning they are unlikely to do anything at all. Make it clear what you want them to do and you are more likely to see results.

6 Not Using SEO

Just posting your video online and hoping your viewers will find it, is not enough. One of the foremost aims of anyone creating a video is to get it found and viewed, for this to happen, you need to optimise the video. SEO is important for boosting your search engine ranking and increasing your chances of being found. If you don’t use optimisation techniques then your video will not work for you. We have lots of videos on our You Tube channel that can give you information and tips for optimising your videos. So watch and subscribe for help!

7 Expecting Instant Results

In an age where most things are quick and instant, it is important to remember that some things you have to be patient with, video is one of those things. It is unlikely that your video will gain thousands of views in just a few days and you do have to work at views by optimising your video and marketing it. If you are patient and work to achieve views and popularity, your video will work well for you.

8 Unsuitable Placement Of Selling Points

You need to ensure that you place your selling points and your call to action suitably in your video. As previously mentioned, viewer engagement tends to drop towards the end of your video, if your audience click off before seeing your call to action or selling point then they will not know what action to take after viewing the video and you may not achieve your objectives.

9 Failing To Speak To Your Target Audience

Focus your messages on your target market. Trying to appeal to everyone won’t work as different people have different interests. By not focusing on just your target audience, you run the risk that your message won’t be received or acted upon by anyone. You will already know who your target market is and what they want, use that information to adapt messages and develop a script.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140627095904-12932152-10-video-marketing-mistakes-to-avoid?trk=hb_ntf_MEGAPHONE_ARTICLE_POST 

Wednesday, 25 June 2014

All about Google Analytics Chrome Extension

The Google Analytics team recently released a Chrome Extension that allows you to get detailed information about each page of your website while you browse it. Below I will go through some of the extension's features and how to use it to get a better idea of what is going on in your website.
In order to use the extension you will need any kind of Google Analytics permission to the website you are analyzing, a Chrome browser and the Extension (download here). Once you have those three, you can click on the Google Analytics icon on your browser while browsing your website (the icon is usually found on the top right corner of the page). 
Below is the extension's interface map with all its functionalities followed by an explanation of each.

The Page Analytics Chrome Extension allows you to see how customers interact with your web pages, including what they click and don’t click. 

Use these insights to optimize your website layout, improve user experience, and increase conversions. When you view a web page for which you have Google Analytics access, you’ll see: Google Analytics metrics: Pageviews, Unique Pageviews, Avg time on page, Bounce Rate, and %Exit Number of active visitors, in real time In-page click analysis: (where users click) You can use the Google Analytics date comparison and segmentation tools directly in the extension. 

Pages you are tracking with the Google Analytics code for an account your Google account login has access to will appear like this in your Chrome browse.

Notice that by installing this extension, you agree to the Google Terms of Service and Privacy Policy at https://www.google.com/intl/en/policies/.

Resources: 
1- https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/page-analytics-by-google/fnbdnhhicmebfgdgglcdacdapkcihcoh?hl=en
2- http://online-behavior.com/analytics/in-page


Thursday, 5 June 2014

Third Party Management Tools for Google+ Pages (Infographic)

Google+ has worked with several social media management companies to add Google+ functionality in their management tools. These companies provide brands and businesses more flexibility and power to run their Google+ pages. This includes tools to post and comment on Google+ pages, and create and manage circles. You can learn more about the companies here